Browsing Category


Artist, Painting

Keri Oldham’s ‘Labyrinth’: Fashion, Demons, and the Search Within Ouselves

Keri Oldham

Brooklyn-based artist Keri Old­ham has recently opened her lat­est solo exhi­bi­tion at Kirk Hop­per Fine Art in Dal­las, Texas. Enti­tled Labyrinth, her beau­ti­ful water­color paint­ings are an alle­gor­i­cal series that’s inspired by the 1980 cult-classic film, as well as the ancient myth of the Minotaur.

The gallery describes the work in Keri’s show as com­bin­ing “images of demons and war­riors with tragic fig­ures and vic­to­ri­ous ones. With armored women at its cen­ter, these pieces spin a new story on The­seus enter­ing the maze and con­fronting the beast within.” The allur­ing pieces fuse medieval beasts with fash­ion and fan­tasy, rep­re­sent­ing inner tur­moil and desires the many of us feel—to find mean­ing and suc­cess in our adult lives.

I love both the con­cept of Labyrinth and the style of Keri’s at-times grotesque paint­ings. They’re cre­ated with pig­ment, graphite, and applied paper pulp, adding these bril­liant tex­tures to her dizzy­ing col­ors and patterns.

If you’re in Dal­las, check out her exhi­bi­tion! It’s up until Novem­ber 14 of this year.

Keri Oldham








This Hot Pink Room has a Patterned Wallpaper Comprising 5,000 Intact Bugs

Jennifer Angus

Artist Jen­nifer Angus has cre­ated an instal­la­tion that might gross you out, but it’s sure to fas­ci­nate you! Called In the Gar­den, she has wall­pa­pered a hot pink-painted room with a gor­geous tex­tured pat­tern that com­prises 5,000 (!!) bugs. She col­lected the crit­ters from south­east Asia and arranged them on the wall with their nat­ural col­or­ing intact—think iri­des­cent greens, blues, and pearly mauves.  The crea­tures form skull shapes and other dec­o­ra­tive motifs and take over a room in the newly-renovated Ren­wick Gallery at the Smith­son­ian Amer­i­can Art Museum. (This space offi­cially opens on Novem­ber 13.)

Jennifer’s piece is one of nine art­works in Won­der, the inau­gural exhi­bi­tion of the Ren­wick Gallery. In addi­tion to her bugs, the other artists will each occupy a dif­fer­ent gallery in the build­ing and turn their space into a room-size instal­la­tion.  I’m not far from its loca­tion in Wash­ing­ton, DC, so I’m going to pop in one week­end and check it out. Fun! (Via design­boom)

Jennifer Angus





Artist, Illustrator

Silly Childhood Superstitions, Illustrated by Natalia Yamshchikova

Natalia Yamshchikova

Are you super­sti­tious? As a kid, I was, but as an adult—not so much. Russ­ian illus­tra­tor Natalia Yamshchikova cre­ated a series of beau­ti­ful ply­wood paint­ings that pay homage to these unjus­ti­fied beliefs. They sound silly now, but just think back to your child­hood. Would you have believed any of these? I prob­a­bly would have! Maybe that just makes me gullible…


If you throw your cut hair away birds will pick up it, build a nest, and give you a headache.

Natalia Yamshchikova

Natalia Yamshchikova




One hun­dred mos­quito bites will lead to your death.




If you swal­low a whole sun­flower seed it will sprout in your belly.



If you yawn at your reflec­tion in the mir­ror you will ruin your beauty.




If you look at the moon long enough you’ll become a lunatic.



Artist, Textiles

Part Tapestry, Part Friendship Bracelet: Weavings by Alicia Scardetta

Included in Coordinate Disregard

Above: included in Coor­di­nate Disregard

This past week­end, I went to the open­ing of Coor­di­nate Dis­re­gard at the Ter­rault Con­tem­po­rary in Bal­ti­more. There, I saw the work Brooklyn-based fiber artist Ali­cia Scardetta, who I’ve been fol­low­ing on Insta­gram but hadn’t before seen her col­or­ful weav­ings in per­son. And let me tell you, they are awe­some. Intri­cate and jubi­lant, they com­bine a vari­ety of weav­ing tech­niques and are “part tapes­try, part friend­ship bracelet.”

To pro­duce these metic­u­lous pieces, Ali­cia uses frame tapes­try looms and cre­ates para­me­ters for each weav­ing. Through this, she explores the pos­si­bil­i­ties and lim­i­ta­tions of the “grid struc­ture that forms woven tex­tiles.” The process isn’t unlike illus­tra­tion. In both fields, there are guide­lines you must oper­ate within, and part of the chal­lenge is fig­ur­ing out how to let your artis­tic voice shine.

If you’re local to Charm City, make sure you check out Coor­di­nate Dis­re­gard. It’s up until Sep­tem­ber 26 and in addi­tion to Ali­cia, includes work by: Ran­dall Lear, Elissa Levy, Gabriel Luis Perez, and Cur­tis Miller. Plus, it’s curated by my pal Amy Boone-McCreesh, who is also an amaz­ing artist!

Alicia Scardetta Alicia Scardetta Alicia Scardetta Alicia-6 Alicia-5 Alicia-4 Alicia-3 Alicia-2

Artist, Ceramics

Rebekah Miles Paints One-Of-A Kind Book Covers and Country Music Stars

Fun fact: I found Rebekah Miles’ work totally by chance. I was Googling some­one of the same name, and her Insta­gram popped up as one of the top results. Think­ing she was that some­one else, I was pleas­antly sur­prised when I saw a por­trait of Reba McEn­tire and June Carter.

Rebekah Miles

Rebekah cre­ates faux book cov­ers in the same ges­tural style as her por­traits. Describ­ing this on-going project, she writes:

I paint one-of-a-kind book jack­ets on spe­cific artists, pho­tog­ra­phers, and some lit­er­a­ture. The selected books are a ref­er­ence to art his­tory and the art of libraries. I choose an image to paint for a cover illus­tra­tion based on qual­i­ties such as poignancy and visual graph­ics. If the book is not illus­trated, I find an image that is com­ple­men­tary to its contents.

Rebekah Miles

Rebekah Miles






Rebekah also makes ceram­ics. They are, as she describes, “inter­pre­ta­tions of images that appeal to a sense of place and beauty, such as an antique lote­ria set (Mex­i­can bingo) from the 1800’s, a seed savers exchange cat­a­logue, and a Cal­i­for­nia native plant iden­ti­fi­ca­tion book.”









Laura Garcia Serventi Paints the Plants I Wish I Had

Laura Garcia Serventi

Using acrylic, gouache, and water­color pig­ments, Laura Gar­cia Ser­venti paints the plant col­lec­tions I wish I had. The col­or­ful scenes fea­ture tall suc­cu­lents and flow­er­ing cacti, neatly pot­ted and sit­ting on a geo­met­ric floor.  They’re healthy and flour­ish­ing, which is more than I can say for some of the plants in my apartment.

Pur­chase these images as prints in Laura’s Etsy shop!

Laura Garcia Serventi

Laura Garcia Serventi






Wearable Art: Anna Talbot’s Beautifully Sculptural Jewelry

anna talbot

Nor­we­gian craft artist Anna Tal­bot pro­duces col­or­ful jew­elry that’s beau­ti­fully uncon­ven­tional. Vibrant, bold shapes are lay­ered and cre­ate com­plex scenes fea­tur­ing birds, flo­ral arrange­ments, and tall trees. Each piece is spe­cial and daz­zling, and con­jures fairy tales and other fan­tas­tic sto­ries. Wear­able art indeed. (Via Lustik)


anna talbot anna-talbot-4 anna-talbot-7 anna-talbot-6 anna-talbot-8 anna-talbot-9 anna-talbot-10 anna-talbot-3

Artist, Illustrator

Eero Lampinen’s Beautiful Depictions of Strange Lands

Eero Lampinen

On both Mon­day and Tues­day of this week, I’ve fea­tured illus­tra­tions that are strange. So, how about I make Wednes­day just as weird? I recently posted the work of Eero Lampinen on my Insta­gram to great response. And, why not? The beau­ti­ful images are really well drawn and fea­ture odd, inter­est­ing depic­tions of nature. Giant bugs crawl over styl­ish young peo­ple who dare to ven­ture into lands unknown.

I would love to see what Lampinen does with a graphic novel. Con­sid­er­ing the way they set up a sin­gle scene, pan­els upon pan­els of them would be amazing.

Eero LampinenEero Lampinen eero-lampinen-6eero-lampinen-2eero-lampinen-10 eero-lampinen-3


Wooden People Capture the Imagination of Children

melanie rustonI posted about some wooden peo­ple ear­lier, so why not more? Melanie Rus­ton is a Baltimore-based artist who’s study­ing to be an art teacher (and about to grad­u­ate!). Her paint­ings are influ­enced by work­ing with chil­dren as a camp coun­selor and an intern; specif­i­cally, them draw­ing from their imag­i­na­tions with­out fear of the final result.

When I paint, I take char­ac­ters from my sketch­book and flesh out their exis­tence in imag­ined stores, where they deal with embar­rass­ment, tri­umph, and rela­tion­ships with oth­ers,” she writes in an artist state­ment. Melanie goes on, stat­ing, “Com­bin­ing a Renais­sance tech­nique with the artis­tic skills of a child, I leave clues for the viewer to solve and under­stand these moments for themselves.”

Fol­low Melanie on Tum­blr.

melanie ruston melanie ruston melanieruston-4 melanieruston-6 melanieruston-7 melanieruston-5

Here are some non-wooden peo­ple, includ­ing a mural!

melanieruston-8 melanieruston-10


Artist, Sculpture

Sandra Fettingis Expresses Relationships Via Bold Geometry

Sandra Fettingis

Denver-based artist San­dra Fet­tingis cre­ates bold sculp­tures, instal­la­tions, and murals using a vari­ety of geo­met­ric shapes. “…I strive to demon­strate rela­tion­ships, com­mu­ni­ca­tion, change, and mind­ful atten­tion,” she writes in an artist state­ment. “I mix and layer mate­ri­als such as acrylic, styrene, wood, paper and paint, and uti­lize the laser for its pre­ci­sion, while for­mu­lat­ing sys­tem­atic guide­lines, rep­e­ti­tion and pur­pose­fully restrained color palettes.”

San­dra strives to com­bine art and archi­tec­ture seam­lessly. Her beau­ti­ful pieces, strong shapes are a per­fect match with beams, floor­boards, and of course, walls.

sandra-1 sandra-2 sandra-5 sandra-7 sandra-6sandra-9 sandra-10 Sandra Fettingis Sandra Fettingis