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Sketchbooks

Sketchbooks

1 Theme, 5 Ways: Sketchbooks That Are Handheld Works of Art

Illustrated sketchbooks

The sketchbook is a powerful place. It’s a place where artists and illustrators can play—try out new techniques, subject matter, or even jot down the occasional note. Many people prefer to keep these books private, and I don’t blame them. They can be incredibly personal spaces. So, I’m always delighted by those who choose to let us in on their sketchbook—it’s like seeing how someone’s mind works.

There are some who, with little effort, are able to make every page of their sketchbook look like a finished work of art. These books, in turn, are not just places to jot down lists or make a silly doodle. Rather, they’re intimate galleries that travel with them as they move throughout the world.

Here are 5 different illustrators who take the sketchbook to a whole new level.

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Sketchbooks

Sketchbook Paintings That Come Alive Before Your Eyes

Last week, we took a peek into the shape-shifting sketchbook of Eva Magill-Oliver. Artist Bryce Wymer, aka A Flat Earth, is another creative who for him, a sketchbook is a portable gallery to showcase his beautiful and mysterious paintings. And if that’s not enough, Bryce has created a series of short time-lapse videos that demonstrate his process.

The videos are a combination of show-and-tell and painting in progress. Bryce will often start out by flipping through some completed (or nearly completed) spreads, and then he’ll complete an illustration right before our eyes.

Check out some of Bryce’s videos, as well as his static spreads. (h/t Less Talk More Illustration)

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Sketchbooks

The Shape-Shifting Sketchbooks of Eva Magill-Oliver

Eva Magill Oliver sketchbooks

I’m a huge fan of sketchbooks… probably because my attempts to keep them always come up short. So, it’s no wonder that I’ve been fawning over Eva Magill-Oliver‘s books the past few days. They’re a combination of beautiful colors, bold shapes, and playful design. Unlike my pencil scribbles and sloppy note-taking, she uses each spread as an opportunity to make organic works of art. Eva will cut into pages, arrange pieces on top, and go outside of the book by attaching other bits of paper. In this way, the confines of the spreads are merely a suggestion—one that she’s happy to disregard.

In her artist statement, Eva writes that nature drives her color and imagery. “The natural world is an infinite resource for documenting and exploring shapes, patterns, and textures,” she says. “It also invites personal reflection and meditation.” Just like a sketchbook.

Follow Eva on Instagram to see what she’s working on now.

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