Embroidery

One Year of Life is Chronicled in “One Year of Stitches”

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

What would a year of stitches look like? Hannah Claire Somerville is currently in the midst of exploration with her project aptly-called 1 Year of Stitches. The premise is simple—each day, she adds at least a stitch (often many more) to the same embroidery hoop. Day by day, the design grows, and with 2016 nearly complete, Hannah has a lot to show for it. Nestled throughout the sprawling threads are the likes of small abstract shapes and colorful characters, each with their own story to tell.

Hannah has chronicled 1 Year of Stitches through Instagram. It’s both a documentation of process as well as a diary—each post is accompanied by what she did that day.

The first stitches have been made. ——————————————– I am interested in the impact, or mark, that an individual makes on a daily basis. Big or small, our daily activities are often times unquantifiable and intangible. I am approaching this project as a personal map making; the fabric ground represents each day of 2016, with the needle and thread representing my actions throughout the day. I will embroider— maybe one stitch, maybe more, (hopefully) every day and photograph the result. The embroidery I create will become a tangible, visual account of the decisions, movements, conversations and sometimes lack there of, that I make each day. I hope to use this project as a means of creating mindfulness and deeper reflection upon the choices we make as a society. Rules and Stipulations: 1. My fabric ground consists of a 12’’ x 12’’ swatch of unbleached Osnaburg. The thread I use may change daily and I may adhere additional types of media to my swatch with thread. 2. I will embroider something on my fabric ground each day and post a photograph of the result each day. 3. It is not required that I make a stitch— some days you definitely do not contribute anything to society. I still must post a photograph of the current state of my fabric ground. 4. I am allowed to remove stitches, because mistakes can sometimes be undone. 5. I am allowed to begin additional fabric grounds should I choose to do so. Ideally, I hope to work on the same fabric ground continuously, but sometimes life takes you to a different place than you expect. 6. More rules and stipulations may be added as the project evolves and lessons are learned. #1yearofstitches #stitch #embroidery #embroideryart #art #2016

A photo posted by 1 year of stitches. (@1yearofstitches) on

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 4, 2016

1. Shut-Eye ‘Lash’ Stud Earrings by Ginny Reynders
2. Frog Plate by Kom
3. Vegan Necklace by La Vidriola (I became obsessed with it after Tuesday’s post)
4. Portugal in a Can by Mar Cerdá
5. Flutter Necklaces and Rings by Black Rabbit Studio
6. Bangles by Dinara Mirtalipova
7. Tropical Birds Tile by Bodil Jane (I recently wrote about her work!)

Looking for an advent calendar for Christmas? Harriet Gray of the Hello Harriet shop is now taking pre-orders for her delightful calendar that comes complete with “24 purrfectly grumpy temporary tattoos,” plus an enamel pin on Christmas day.

Cat advent calendar by Hello Harriet

Illustration

Spellbinding Nature Scenes Showcase the Intricate Beauty of Earth

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustrates spell-binding scenes of nature. Intricately detailed and visually complex, the layers of flora and fauna draw you into these snippets of stories, which act as a fantasy for a city dweller like me. Long grass, fields of flowers, and bodies of water seem like distant relatives—so Kailey’s work is especially nice to view, especially when your windows overlook concrete.

Kailey sells a selection of her work on Society6.

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration
Illustration

Ethereal Paintings Combine Color and Emotion for a Dreamlike Feel

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustrator Diana Cojocaru first caught my attention with her collection entitled Human Wings. Using water-based media, she lets the vibrant hues have a mind of their own as they bleed into one another and create a dreamlike feel. Hands are a thematic occurrence in her work, and about the series, she explains it with one single quote by Sanober Khan: “Your hand touching mine—this is how galaxies collide.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

 

In her Beyond project, Diana was inspired by a passion for flowers, hidden messages, and again—hands!

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana’s current project started as a challenge to herself. 

“I’ve always considered that I’m not able to draw portraits, with everything I’ve created so far revolving around abstract concepts,” she tells me an in an email. “Even though my style is a clumsy one, I want to bring my illustrations into the fashion area and to communicate through the clumsiness itself that every woman has a beauty which is often hidden behind peculiar features, far from the stereotypes.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana Cojocaru illustrations
Illustrated products

This Woman’s Illustrative Attire Will Give You Serious Outfit Envy

Charlotte Jacobs (aka @charrrl_iie) pingame

I’ve got serious envy of Charlotte Jacobs (aka @charrrl_iie) illustrative outfits. The Belgium-based fashionista adorns her daily attire with playful pins, necklaces, and sweaters, creating a collision of characters, color, and pattern. She’s not afraid to mix patterns and colors, and for that—I commend her. I wish I was as bold!

I’ve included her original Instagram posts because she tags her photos with the makers who created the charming products.

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

A photo posted by 💘🐺 (@charrrl_iie) on

Charlotte Jacobs (aka @charrrl_iie) illustrative outfits
BPB Projects, Embroidery, Sculpture

I Made This: My Halloween Costume

Halloween costume — a bouquet of flowersHappy Halloween! I am a big fan of the holiday (because, candy) but never really made an elaborate costume before—until this year. Finally , I got my act together and worked on an outfit months and months beforehand (I’m a marathoner, not a sprinter).

I’m a bouquet of flowers!

Halloween costume, detail To produce this project required a lot of felt and hot glue. It was time consuming, but not difficult. (Process-oriented people, you’d probably enjoy making this costume.) Basically, it’s a green hood (made from felt) with a bunch of handcrafted felt flowers glued on top and around the crown of the base. These are the tutorials I used:

They’re super easy to follow and well-documented so that you can follow along. I wish I had an excuse to make more! After the flowers were assembled, arranged, and glued, I wrapped tulle around the hood to create the appearance of tissue paper. I completed it by tying it with a coral-colored bow.

I tried to get a picture with my little baby Sadie. She was not pleased.

Halloween costume — a bouquet of flowers

Halloween costume — a bouquet of flowers
Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, October 28

1. Santa Serpiente Candle by Collette Marie Shop
2. Wood-Book Clutch by vosk.studio
3. 2017 Calendar by Sarah Andreacchio
4. Pencil Chopstick Holders by Yinfan Huang
5. Everyday Bravey Enamel Pins by Emily McDowell
6. Monkey Pot by Charlotte Mei
7. Eye Notebook by Designs Tandem

As someone who uses a sleep mask (a must-have if your partner just has to fall asleep with the TV on), I am super excited to make this project by The House That Lars Built. My current sleeping mask is so boring!

diy-face-masks-16

Illustration

1 Theme, 5 Ways: Scenes from #Inktober 2016

#Inktober 2016 composite

It’s that wonderful time of year again when #Inktober (previously, 2014 and 2015) makes an appearance on social media. If you’re unfamiliar with this annual tradition, it’s a creative challenge for artist and illustrators to ink something during the month of October. Many people choose to post something everyday, but Jake Parker writes, “You can do it daily, or go the half-marathon route and post every other day, or just do the 5K and post once a week. What ever you decide, just be consistent with it. INKtober is about growing and improving and forming positive habits, so the more you’re consistent the better.”

While I don’t participate, I love seeing what other people come up with! Jake provides some prompts, but you’re totally welcome to go off script and create your own themes. Here are 5 illustrators who showcase the possibilities with #Inktober.

Julia Bereciartu

Julia Bereciartu illustration for #inktober 2016

For this year’s #Inktober, Julia Bereciartu is painting “spontaneous portraits in ink and watercolor” every two days or so. Composed of people and animals, these small artworks are for sale through her online shop.

Julia Bereciartu #inktober 2016

Julia Bereciartu #inktober 2016

Gina Triplett

Gina Triplett illustration in sketchbook #inktober 2016

Gina Triplett has one of my favorite Instagram accounts, and her version the October challenge mostly takes place in her sketchbook. The focus is on black and white with splashes of vibrant color.

Gina Triplett illustration in sketchbook #inktober 2016

Gina Triplett illustration in sketchbook #inktober 2016

August Wren

August Wren illustration #inktober 2016

While Gina stuck with the striking black and white combo, August Wren lets her inky hues explode over the page. The carefree fluidity and diffused edges are created with both a dip pin as well as brush.

In addition to #Inktober, August also creates a painting a day. She’s prolific!

August Wren illustration #inktober 2016

August Wren illustration #inktober 2016

Gian Wong

Gian Wong typography #inktober 2016

Designy illustrator Gian Wong uses #Inktober to make sure his “trad[itional] hands aren’t getting rusty,” His bold, typography-centric pieces feature letters as the burst from bold patterns and colors.

Gian Wong typography #inktober 2016

Gian Wong typography #inktober 2016

Kathleen Marcotte

Kathleen Marcotte illustration #inktober 2016

Kathleen Marcotte created an apt theme for this month—horror movies! Her black and white drawings are a much less scary reinterpretation of some seriously spooky films.

Kathleen Marcotte #inktober 2016 Kathleen Marcotte #inktober 2016

 

Ceramics

Intricate Patterned Line Drawings are Actually Gorgeous Ceramic Pottery

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Ceramicist Suzanne Sullivan produces pottery with intricate surface decoration that creates an awesome illusion. When viewed from a certain angle, the objects look like 2D ink drawings. They’ve got bold, flattened designs reminiscent of a sketchbook, with a consistency in line weight that often remains unchanged across the surface—because of this, our eye is fooled.

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

suzanne-sullivan-20

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics

Suzanne wrote a quick FAQ on her Instagram, including some shops that sell her work:

Suzanne Sullivan ceramics