Adorable Assemblages Beautifullly Tie Together Disparate Matrials

blanca helgaSpan­ish illus­tra­tor Blanca Helga takes seem­ingly dis­parate mate­ri­als — card­board, painted papers, string, and pack­ag­ing — and assem­bles it all into adorable col­lages. Hansel and Gre­tel, smil­ing horses, col­or­ful drag­ons, and googly-eyed fly­ing crea­tures all make an appear­ance in her work.

I’m a big fan of shapes and how they’re designed, and this aspect is some of my favorite parts of Blanca’s work. I love how she takes oddly-formed card­board and papers piece and trans­forms them into heads and bod­ies. The small bits of string and paper also give me the dis­tinct feel­ing that she’s “paint­ing” with scis­sors (or torn edges).

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The fol­low­ing images are from Blanca’s Self Por­trait Project. Her por­trait fits into a small, neat book that uses trans­paren­cies to layer flow­ers and dif­fer­ent shapes. Very cool!

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Noa Snir’s Gorgeous Illustrations Teeter on the Edge of Strangness

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When I was read­ing about illus­tra­tor Noa Snir on her web­site, she men­tioned that she enjoys all things illus­trated. “Just about any­thing that can serve as an excuse to sit down and draw long into the night,” is how she put it. I love that sen­ti­ment! I am some­one who goes to bed early, but still.

Noa’s illus­tra­tions teeter on the edge of strange­ness. Many of them are very col­or­ful and include gor­geous flower arrange­ments cou­pled with lus­cious land­scapes. But, with that beauty comes sev­ered heads, lone­li­ness, and pools of blood. I find this both intrigu­ing and alarm­ing, and ulti­mately enjoy how not every­thing is so sac­cha­rine. See more (NSFW) illus­tra­tions on Noa’s Flickr.

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Eerie, Aged-Looking Illustrations Inspired by the Occult

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Tin Can For­est a moniker for the col­lab­o­ra­tive work of Cana­dian artists Pat Shew­chuk and Marek Colek. Together, they cre­ate sequen­tial art, film, and books that are inspired by the forests of Canada, Slavic art, and occult folklore.

When I first saw their illus­tra­tions, I thought that they might’ve been pro­duced years and years ago. They have an aged look to them because of the dis­tressed tex­ture that Tin Can For­est uses. It knocks all of their col­ors down in sat­u­ra­tion, mak­ing it look like you’d find them in the pages of a worn-out (and well-loved) book.

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Find a Comforting Glow in These Cardboard Homes

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Vera van Wolferen calls her­self a “card­board­craftswoman,” because she cre­ates intri­cate and meticulously-constructed scenes out of card­board. They’re incred­i­ble! Using the white/gray vari­ety, she adds a few other mate­ri­als that result in dream-like scenes. I love how the shut­ters, weather vanes, and wind­mills are all artic­u­lated, as if they’re placed one by one. You can tell that Vera puts a lot of care into her work.

Much of Vera’s card­board sets are made for stop-motion ani­ma­tions. In addi­tion, she cre­ates lamps, which are per­fect for her houses. They fit over the top of light bulbs and cast a com­fort­ing glow from the win­dows. Find a few of them on Etsy.

Vera seems like she’s on all the social media — fol­low her on Insta­gram, Behance, and Face­book! (Via iGNANT)

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10 (More) Submissions From the Collage Scrap Exchange

Happy Fri­day, ya’ll! I fig­ured it’s a fine time to post some more Col­lage Scrap Exchange sub­mis­sions. At this point, I’ve received so many (hun­dreds upon hun­dreds!), and not shar­ing at least some felt like a crime. Here are 10 sub­mis­sions! Remem­ber, the extended dead­line is March 15.

Thank you, to every­one, who has sub­mit­ted a col­lage so far. I’m delighted to see all of the cre­ative ways you used your scraps and inter­preted the New Land­scapes theme. While I can’t share all of the images on Brown Paper Bag, all entries will be on dis­play on the Col­lage Scrap Exchange web­site once the dead­line passes.

See past sub­mis­sion posts here and here.

Kelly Hayes

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Please note: These are merely selec­tion of sub­mis­sions, and their inclu­sion in this post has no impact on the over­all out­come of the #col­lage­con­test with Papir­mass.

Stacey Page Adds Bizarre Embroidery onto Vintage Photos

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Stacey Page trans­forms dis­carded vin­tage pho­tographs from banal to fan­tas­tic in her on-going series of embroi­dered por­traits. Since 2008, she’s adorned men and women with bizarre head­dresses, cos­tumes, facial hair, and much more. This is both con­cep­tu­ally and visu­ally inter­est­ing. I love that the stitch­ing cre­ates a “sec­ond skin” and a new nar­ra­tive onto the old pic­tures. And, at the same time, it’s a great con­trast between the smooth sil­ver gelatin pho­tos beneath the fuzzy threads.

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Natalie Wargin’s Visual Respite from All That Cold

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It’s been so bit­terly cold on the east coast over the past few weeks, I for­got what it was like when it’s warm. So, Natalie Wargin’s water­color works are a nice visual respite from the frigid temps. Her loosely-handled paint­ings fea­ture birds, bears, and flow­ers in bloom. I love how the col­ors flow into one another and cre­ate a feel­ing of energy and free­dom. It makes me want to go for a hike!

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Ceramic Vessels Want You to Remember Nice Things

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Sachie Kaneko, aka Kusafane, is the woman behind these sweet-looking ceram­ics. They’re meant as small sculp­tures as well as prac­ti­cal objects like vases and can­dle hold­ers. In addi­tion, Kaneko wants her hand­i­work to be some­thing that has a pos­i­tive asso­ci­a­tion attached to it — like, if you received it as a gift from a spe­cial some­one in your life. These pieces will hope­fully con­jure a won­der­ful mem­ory when you see them!

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Daniela Tieni’s Intriguing Illustrations Feel like Film Stills

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Peo­ple, often long and dark haired women, occupy the strange spaces in Daniela Tieni’s work. The sur­real images fea­ture them wad­ing through vines, stand­ing on cubed struc­tures in the mid­dle of nowhere, and talk­ing to larger-than-life birds. It’s intrigu­ing if not slightly unsettling.

Daniela writes that she loves movies (from the 1950s), which def­i­nitely fits her sub­ject mat­ter. The fash­ion and hair­styles fit that era, and these illus­tra­tions feel like they are snip­pets from a film.

Check out Daniela’s Behance page or her Flickr for more.

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Look Closely at These Busy Patterns by Monica Ramos

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Mon­ica Ramos (pre­vi­ously) is a favorite illus­tra­tor of mine, and her tal­ents were recently high­lighted in the Rachel Antonoff Fall 2015 fash­ion show. Pat­terns fea­tur­ing frogs in var­i­ous stages of dis­sec­tion as well as a high school love tri­an­gle adorn a dress, shirt, and jumpsuit.

Maybe you’re ask­ing your­self, “high school love tri­an­gle?” And yes, you read that right. The col­lec­tion is on it! Antonoff tells Women’s Wear Daily, “There’s Fern, the stu­dent who’s hav­ing an affair with her biol­ogy teacher, Sey­mour, who is in love with the botany teacher, Angel­ica, who is in love with Fern.” A bet­ter look at Monica’s pat­terns are below.

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Here’s a few more pieces from the col­lec­tion. The pat­terns and embroi­dery aren’t by Ramos, but I like ‘em! See the entire show here.

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