Collage, Printmaking

Leah Durant

Based in Leeds, Leah Durant states that her pri­mary pas­sion is pho­tog­ra­phy, which is melded with print­mak­ing, col­lage, and drawing.

In col­laged pieces, Leah’s pho­tog­ra­phy is often non-specific and enlarged to high­light tex­ture. Aes­thet­i­cally, I love the dif­fused nature of her mark-making and pho­tos, which speaks to the larger scope of her work. She writes:

The inten­tion of my work is to visu­ally record the sub­tleties in every­day life that we do not always notice or appre­ci­ate. For exam­ple, the idea of paus­ing and enjoy­ing a moment that is right there in front of our eyes, such as a shadow on a wall, a piece of paper in the wind, or a reflec­tion in a win­dow. Through cap­tur­ing details of things that may seem insignif­i­cant in our daily lives, the frag­mented beauty of the sub­ject is brought to the fore­front and chaos is pushed back. Ulti­mately, the raw purity and fragility of the image is unravelled.

All images via her website/Tumblr.

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Miscellany

Studio Visit // Jowita Wyszomirska

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

If you were to walk by MICA’s Stu­dio Cen­ter on North Avenue (close to what I am told is the slow­est McDonald’s in the world) dur­ing the month of Jan­u­ary, then you most likely saw the work of Jowita Wys­zomirska through the win­dow of MICA’s Cura­to­r­ial Stud­ies gallery, The Tem­po­rary. Three site-specific instal­la­tions were fea­tured in her solo show, Ten­u­ous Con­nec­tion. I met Jowita in her stu­dio that is housed in School 33, an art space in down­town Bal­ti­more. The space itself has won­der­ful views of the city and a lot of room for her and her hus­band to share their work space.

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita’s recent endeav­ors take shape in instal­la­tions (such as the one in her stu­dio) and draw­ings. Pen, gouache, and tape are all used to cre­ate intri­cate works that are metic­u­lous yet min­i­mal in detail. Cit­ing archi­tec­ture and maps as inspi­ra­tion, a recent set of draw­ings reflect the routes of the Pur­ple Line, a bus line of the Charm City Cir­cu­la­tor in Baltimore.

It was nice to see the pro­gres­sion that Jowita’s work has taken. In a rel­a­tively short period of time, her work went from three dimen­sional paint­ings of build­ings, to a focus on the folded forms of those build­ings, to the instal­la­tion on the wall. Always want­ing to chal­lenge her­self, Jowita told me it was to fueled by the desire to speed up her work­ing process. Tape is faster than paint — more imme­di­ate results and exer­cises ideas quickly.

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Below: An exam­ple of the boxes Jowita made after paint­ing archi­tec­ture. Image via web­site.

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Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Over­all, I liked Jowita’s way of work­ing jux­ta­posed with the result of her work (instal­la­tions, specf­i­cally). Although she tends not to sketch before she starts work­ing, her years of being an exhi­bi­tion fab­ri­ca­tor have made her process-oriented and it seems to have keep her attuned to refin­ing her artis­tic process. So far, this has been work­ing — her work con­tin­ues to move on an inter­est­ing path of abstracted obser­va­tions. I’ll be excited to see the work she has com­ing up for an exhi­bi­tion in June, and how it is a con­tin­u­a­tion of where she is work­ing now.

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Thanks Jowita!

Artist

Sarah Williamson

The illus­tra­tion and paint­ings of Sarah Williamson are sim­ply won­der­ful, uti­liz­ing a few dif­fer­ent tech­niques to bring forth her visual lan­guage. There is a major empha­sis on the free­dom of media (as she paints with wet-on-wet) and a love the fig­ure and land­scape. Inspired by what’s around her, the Brook­lynite writes:

I used to work, but one day I picked up a pen and images came, I began to see all of the dreams the decay and the excess around me. Around all of us. I once read in a very famous book, “All things are full of labor, man can­not utter it…” But I don’t think of what I do now as labor. My work feels like a nat­ural prod­uct of curios­ity about our sur­round­ings: peo­ple and things dis­in­te­grat­ing, dream­ing, liv­ing, not liv­ing. The world is full of color, I can­not utter.

All images via her web­site.

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Sculpture

Gina Dawson

I first spoke of the work of Gina Daw­son when I saw it as part of a group show, Boundry Proof, at the Guest Spot Art Space in Bal­ti­more. She cre­ated these amaz­ing minia­ture funeral wreathes made out of paper. The text on the ban­ners were extracted from rejec­tion let­ters, which Gina had embroidered:

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Check­ing in on Gina’s work, I found dis­cov­ered her newest endeavor — the cre­ation of flow­ers out of paper and place­ment in unex­pected places. Small wild­flow­ers placed in the cracks of build­ings, and green­ery installed on rocks. These small addi­tions to the land­scape really make the passerby more aware and con­scious of the space and make it feel a bit more pre­cious. I’m reminded of the Dis­patch­work project but with an organic twist.

All images via Gina’s blog.

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Artist

Jenny Harp

Jenny Harp is an artist liv­ing and work­ing in San Fran­cisco. Her mixed media work is an exam­i­na­tion of our inner work­ings in rela­tion­ship to cul­ture. From her artist statement:

My present work stems from ten­sions and com­forts that reflect feel­ings of anx­i­ety, cel­e­bra­tion, power and con­trol and the bound­aries between them. Cul­tur­ally I inves­ti­gate the emo­tional rela­tion­ships that dwell in the inter­me­di­ate space between the nat­ural world and the domes­tic world by way of choice mate­ri­als and images from Amer­i­can Sub­cul­tures. I explore rela­tion­ships of color, com­po­si­tion and objects within these contexts.

All images via her web­site.

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Animation, Illustrator

Lisette Berndt aka Thoka Maer

I first saw the work of Lisette Berndt, aka Thoka Maer, through her Tum­blr, It’s No Big­gie. I think I’ve men­tioned how much I love ani­mated GIFs, and was espe­cially delighted to see the ele­ment of the hand in Lisette’s ani­ma­tions. It’s No Big­gie, she writes, is a “satir­i­cal com­ment about our daily life obsta­cles in form of loop­ing gif ani­ma­tion.” All images via her Tum­blr.

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Lisette’s other illus­tra­tions (and ani­ma­tions!) share sim­i­lar qual­i­ties to her GIFs. Styl­is­ti­cally, she uses a light hand with min­i­mal line work to tell a story or describe a place. With col­ored pen­cil, graphite, or ink, Lisette com­mu­ni­cates a feel­ing of intro­spec­tion and a tinge of sadness.

All images via her web­site.

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infra 6 from Thoka Maer on Vimeo.

infra 7 from Thoka Maer on Vimeo.

Miscellany

Never Press Publications

Just after I returned from my Christ­mas vaca­tion, I received an unex­pected pack­age. Upon open­ing it, it was a trove from Never Press.

Never Press publications

Never Press is an inde­pen­dent pub­lish­ing house that is based in Pasadena, Cal­i­for­nia. They boast art books that feed the curios­ity of the artists involved with the projects. From the works I saw, that is most def­i­nitely the case.

While the titles and styles of the indi­vid­ual books in Never Press vary, their sto­ries weave around an abstracted real­ity. Tan­gi­bly, there is an impec­ca­ble crafts­man­ship of their books.

Never Press has rethought the idea of a book with some spe­cial touches. Fold-out cov­ers, DVD accom­pa­ni­ments, and the for­mat of a story is chal­lenged and produced.

'Life Tips from a Man...' by Anna Topuriya and Saejean Oh

I really enjoyed the illus­tra­tions and ani­ma­tions with Sae­jean Oh and Anna Top­uriya. Gin­gerly drawn, Life Tips From a Man Who is Very Afraid of Life tells a story of fears and sit­u­a­tions that can debil­i­tate someone’s exis­tence. From this book, the man who is very afraid of life is scared of many things, smil­ing crowds included.

'Life Tips from a Man...' by Anna Topuriya and Saejean Oh

'Life Tips from a Man...' by Anna Topuriya and Saejean Oh

'Life Tips from a Man...' by Anna Topuriya and Saejean Oh

'Life Tips from a Man...' by Anna Topuriya and Saejean Oh

It’s a nice con­trast… the idea of being afraid paired with these beau­ti­ful and rather unas­sum­ing drawings.

'Core Samples' by Nick Arciaga

Core Sam­ples by Nick Arci­aga is a really nice book to look at. The pages are lush, full of color and tex­ture with a hand­pulled silkscreen cover. As a viewer, you expe­ri­ence the adven­tur­ers’ view of space, oper­a­tions, and tools of the trade. It is a lot of fun.

'Core Samples' by Nick Arciaga

'Core Samples' by Nick Arciaga

'Core Samples' by Nick Arciaga

'Core Samples' by Nick Arciaga

'Home' by James Chong

I thought Home by James Chong was a unique way to expe­ri­ence a story and also lent itself to expe­ri­enc­ing it over and over again. The 12 pages are not bound, but prints! You can leaf through or hang them on your wall. If you choose the lat­ter option, you could reread and re-experience every time you pass by.

'Home' by James Chong

'Home' by James Chong

'Home' by James Chong

'Home' by James Chong
'A Singer Songwriter' by Gabe Gonzales

A Singer Song­writer by Gabe Gon­za­les con­tains a myr­iad of por­traits with a sil­ver holographic-esque cover that folds out!

'A Singer Songwriter' by Gabe Gonzales

'A Singer Songwriter' by Gabe Gonzales

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

Post Com­post, with con­tri­bu­tions from artists James Chong, Nick Arci­aga, Gabe Gon­za­les, Mark Ingram, and Jesse Fill­ing­ham plays on the idea of the title. Despite dif­fer­ent visual lan­guages, over­all the book speaks to a future world and how it has shifted and deals with things left behind. Some of it is pretty grotesque, in which I would not expect any­thing less.

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

'Post Compost'by multiple artists

Thanks to Never Press for send­ing me so much great stuff to look and read!

Artist, Printmaking

Casey Roberts

I’ve only recently begun to learn about cyan­otype, which is pho­to­graphic print­ing process that cre­ates a cyan-blue print. Pho­to­sen­si­tive solu­tion is applied to a sur­face (such as paper or fab­ric), and left to dry in a dark place. Based on the inten­sity of the ingre­di­ents in a solu­tion, dif­fer­ent tones of blues can be acheived. Casey Robert’s work exper­i­ments with this process, using it as an con­cep­tual ele­ment of her work. He writes:

My work illus­trates a fan­tas­tic land­scape. It rep­re­sents nature’s sub­tle way of deal­ing with the pecu­liar aspects in the rela­tion­ship with mankind. A giant glow-in-the-dark heart, or a pile of pre­cious gems tells us that we are loved, just as blood squirt­ing from an oak tree trunk says, all is not well. I am inspired by my con­ver­sa­tion with the land­scape, I imag­ine long mono­logues when pine forests make me laugh and moun­tains test my patience.

All images via his website.

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Illustrator

Laura Gee

Laura Gee intro­duced her­self to me, and upon vis­it­ing her web­site I found an illus­tra­tor who not only illus­trates, but cre­ates instal­la­tions and curates as well.

Laura’s own work uti­lizes sim­ple, bold images and sup­port­ing text that’s often short and sweet. I espe­cially liked this one:

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Paper is also some­thing that Laura explores in the three-dimensional sense, cre­at­ing popup let­ters and hand cut and assem­bled. She curated an exhi­bi­tion, Toy Shop where she made minia­ture houses to pro­mote the show.

All images via her web­site.

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Artist

Ky Anderson

It has been a while since I have talked about the work of Ky Ander­son, but I love it all the same. I enjoy Ky’s use of color, and despite their more muted char­ac­ter­is­tics, they are not mud­dled. And, if they are mud­dled, Ky explains in her state­ment that they are that way by their very nature:

If you stop what you are doing and look as far away as you can, even if it is just in the other room, or if you are lucky enough to be out­side, look as far away as you can. There are so many things/stuff/objects in your way of see­ing far into the dis­tance. Those dis­trac­tions, objects, pat­terns and the small­est open­ing that lets you see even fur­ther are what my paint­ings are about. They are about the things in the way of see­ing as far as you can. Some­times these objects in my paint­ings are from mem­o­ries, mem­o­ries of the color of a room or shape of a hill. The com­bi­na­tion of the strug­gle to see in the dis­tance and flashes of mem­o­ries make up the sto­ries within my paint­ings. Out of these thoughts comes work that looks almost abstract, but in my eyes the com­bi­na­tion of shapes and col­ors have stories.

All images via her web­site. Ky also has a blog detail­ing her art col­lec­tion, which I really enjoyed view­ing as well.

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