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Drawing

Illustration, Interview

A ‘Kick in the Shin of the Patriarchy’ | Interview with Illustrator Hayley Powers Thornton-Kennedy

Hayley Thornton-Kennedy illustration activism strong female figures

Hayley Thornton-Kennedy illustration activism strong female figures

I first met Hay­ley Pow­ers Thorn­ton-Kennedy when I vis­it­ed the MFA Illus­tra­tion Prac­tice pro­gram (MFA ILP) as a guest crit­ic and lec­tur­er. In their cozy, well-lit stu­dio, she showed me a selec­tion of sig­nage she had cre­at­ed for the Women’s March on Jan­u­ary 21. I was instant­ly attract­ed to the bold illus­tra­tions and, above all, imagery fea­tur­ing strong female fig­ures. I had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to talk to Hay­ley more about her work, both in per­son and via email. The con­ver­sa­tion and her illus­tra­tions seem espe­cial­ly fit­ting for today’s Inter­na­tion­al Women’s Day and A Day With­out Wom­en.

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Illustration

Vintage-Inspired Sketchbook Drawings That Depict the Beauty of the Past

Aimee Bee Brooks

If you peruse Aimee Bee BrooksInsta­gram, you’ll find that her sketch­book is full of del­i­cate draw­ings with a retro sen­si­bil­i­ty. In par­tic­u­lar, I’m fond of the illus­tra­tive ladies who don vin­tage hair­styles and fash­ions. Cre­at­ed with a light hand, the por­traits seem to flick­er, like a mem­o­ry you can’t quite grasp onto in your mind—they’re fleet­ing and poignant.

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Illustration

Graphite Drawings That Only Make Us More Curious About The “City”

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Ear­lier this fall, Anja Sušanj shared a series called City, based on a book by Alessan­dro Bar­ic­co. The text influ­enced her great­ly through the years, and was part of the inspi­ra­tion for the­se draw­ings. “City is also the name of my grad­u­a­tion project that tries to recre­ate the mys­te­ri­ous and whim­si­cal world of Gould, a child genius,” she explains.

The sur­re­al illus­tra­tions are cre­at­ed with graphite, and they’re are a beau­ti­ful use of the mate­ri­al. Through her line work and shad­ing Anja has com­mu­ni­cat­ed move­ment and dra­ma, as peo­ple stand in fish­bowls, nav­i­gate through the stom­ach, and wear a house around their head. Each is intrigu­ing and begs a closer look.

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Illustration by Anja Sušanj

Illustration by Anja Sušanj
Illustration

Grandiose Landscapes to Offer You a Moment of Zen

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

We all have our own ways of achiev­ing ~zen~, and for me, it’s wit­ness­ing the beau­ty of grandiose nat­u­ral land­scapes. The vast, seem­ing­ly nev­er-end­ing hori­zon reminds me of just how big the world is, dwarf­ing what­ev­er wor­ries occu­py my brain. Mag­gie Chi­ang cap­tures this feel­ing with exquis­ite snap­shots of open spaces. Inky and drawn tex­tures mim­ic desert sce­nes, rapid waters, and gray skies. In every image, the Earth looks mag­nif­i­cent and makes me want to find the near­est hik­ing trail!

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

Illustration by Maggie Chiang

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Embroidery

Brilliantly Simple Fashion Designs are Pencil Drawings Come to Life

EDDA

Some­times, it’s the most sim­ple approach that makes the biggest impact. Edda Gim­nes, aka EDDA, has cre­at­ed a line of cloth­ing that com­bi­nes the ener­gy and spon­tane­ity of a pen­cil sketch with avant-garde fash­ion. They’re draw­ings brought to life!

Edda pro­duced this stun­ning sur­face design using her non-dom­i­nant left hand and then dig­i­tal­ly print­ed it onto can­vas. The garment’s sil­hou­ettes are basic, but they don’t need to be over­ly sophisticated—their bold, black lines define skin­ny pants, bikini tops, and glam­orous dress­es.

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EDDA

EDDA

EDDA

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EDDA

EDDA

EDDA
Drawing, Illustration

Rose Wong’s Poignant Illustrative Series, ‘Consider Death’

Rose Wong

Last fall, illus­tra­tor Rose Wong had a show called Con­sid­er Death at Grumpy Bert in Brook­lyn. The works includ­ed are poignant and beau­ti­ful in their sim­plic­i­ty —Rose mix­es bold flo­ral ele­ments with geo­met­ric forms, insert­ing a con­tem­pla­tive fig­ure among them. This char­ac­ter, devoid of a face/emotions, could be, as its name­sake sug­gests, con­sid­er­ing the end. It takes the illus­tra­tions to a dark place, but this is in line with Rose’s artis­tic phi­los­o­phy. In an inter­view with Light Grey Art Lab, she explains:

When I get sad or frus­trat­ed, art makes me feel bet­ter. But get­ting myself to draw when I feel down is often an uphill bat­tle. I am often a pos­i­tive and upbeat per­son, but some­times when I draw, the oth­er part of me comes through – the qui­et and con­tem­pla­tive side. I want peo­ple to feel good when they look at my work, but to also find some sad­ness in it. We are all com­plex indi­vid­u­als and life is all about the emo­tion­al expe­ri­ences, whether it be pos­i­tive or not.

See more of Con­sid­er Death on Rose’s Tum­blr. Some of my favorites are below.

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Rose Wong

Illustration

Curious Portraits Capture the Energy of a Sketch

monica-barengo

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again—I love a good pen­cil draw­ing. There’s some­thing so sat­is­fy­ing about see­ing a col­lec­tion of marks. It looks very med­i­ta­tive, and even ther­a­peu­tic? Ital­ian illus­tra­tor Mon­i­ca Baren­go incor­po­rates this style of draw­ing into her work, har­ness­ing the ener­gy of a sketch. Mon­i­ca, how­ev­er, is a more con­trolled with her tech­nique, and will often jux­ta­posed errat­ic mark­ing mak­ing with fine, mea­sured lines.

Monica’s approach ben­e­fits the over­all illus­tra­tions; the con­tained chaos is a great foil to the por­traits of poised, calm indi­vid­u­als. It makes you won­der… do they have some­thing to hide?

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I know I called Monica’s char­ac­ters poised, but this cute fel­low is a wel­come excep­tion:

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Illustration

Patterned Illustrations by Ryn Frank Showcase Beauty in Simplicity

Ryn Frank

Nor­mal­ly, I grav­i­tate towards illus­tra­tions that are full of col­or. But today, I find myself attract­ed to the line draw­ings of Ryn Frank.  They’re beau­ti­ful in their sim­plic­i­ty, con­sist­ing of most­ly thin out­li­nes with a few filled areas. This style lends itself well to details, and Ryn doesn’t shy away from depict­ing tex­tured sur­faces with tiny, metic­u­lous­ly-sketched lines and dot after dot after dot.

Many of Ryn’s illus­tra­tions are used in pat­tern design. The­se would make won­der­ful wall­pa­per, wouldn’t they? (h/t Per­rin)

Ryn Frank

Ryn Frank

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Drawing, Illustration

Wave Your Flag for Mathilde Vangheluwe’s Fantastic Drawings

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Not every artist can make their sketch­es appear like fin­ished works, and vice ver­sa — not every fin­ished piece can have the qual­i­ties of a sketch. Mathilde Vangheluwe is an illus­tra­tor who rides this fine line, and she col­ors her draw­ings with the soft hues of col­ored pen­cils, often leav­ing her ini­tial graphite sketch vis­i­ble. This tech­nique is great way to add some shine and pol­ish to some­thing that can feel raw.

Check out Mathilde’s illus­trat­ed prod­ucts in her shop!

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Mathilde Vangheluwe

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Illustration

Exquisite Illustrations Created with Thousands of Tiny Lines

sara corbett

Count­less tiny lines form the­se exquis­ite illus­tra­tions by Sara Cor­bett. The Brook­lyn-based cre­ative uses the minia­tur­ized ticks in design­ing crea­tures like zebras, bats, fish, and more. They’re seen frol­ick­ing in the woods in unlike­ly pair­ings. (Who would imag­ine that a rac­coon and ele­phant are hang out?)

We all know the pow­er of a small line, but it’s nice to be remind­ed that even the sim­plest mark can imply tex­ture, move­ment, and the dif­fer­ence between tree bark and a rabbit’s fur.

If you enjoy Sara’s style, be sure to check out her comics, too!

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And, a lit­tle extra: Sara also designed and made this cute plush toy!sara-corbett8