Browsing Tag

embroidery

1 Year of Stitches

Make 2017 Your Year of Embroidery: Join the “1 Year of Stitches” Project

1 year of stitches: join the fun!

A few weeks ago, I wrote about Hannah Claire Somerville’s ambitious 365-day project called 1 Year of Stitches. The name says it all—each day, she adds at least one stitch to the same embroidery hoop. Throughout the year, the design grows and grows, taking on a life of its own inside of this circle. In addition to the stitches, each day is chronicled via Instagram and includes a short post. It’s a compelling public diary of sorts.

I’ve thought a lot about Hannah’s project and decided that I want 2017 to be my 1 Year of Stitches. Hannah has always invited people to join her, and yes—I will take her up on the offer! I heard from many of you through my weekly newsletter that you’d be interested in working on it, too.

So, let’s do it! Let’s make 2017 the year of embroidery. 

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Embroidery

Intricately Chaotic Embroideries are the Beautiful Calm Before the Storm

Allie Frazier embroidery

If Slow Stitch Sophie encapsulates intricate wildflowers in her hoop art, Allie Frazier captures the diffused—and chaotic!—beauty that’s reminiscent of a hazy landscape. Using a variety of stitches (including my favorite, French knots) and beading, the layered, textured pieces are similar to abstract patches of fog or storm clouds that could seemingly erupt at any moment.

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Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 11

1. Terrarium Back Patch By Rand Renfrow
2. Snake Knot Ring by Kaye Blegvad
3. Heart Leaf Enamel Pin by Sarah Abbott
4. Lunar Blossom Embroidery Kit by Cozyblue
5. Wall Lamp BULB by Madda
6. Banana Pillow by thing Ind.
7. Mexico Lindo Earrings by La vidriola

Illustrator Leah Goren just came out with this new book that celebrates female friendships, aptly titled Besties. Perfect timing for the gift-giving season—and especially considering the events of this past week.

Besties

Embroidery

A Colorful Embroidered Collar to Add to Your Dream Wardrobe

Señorita Lylo

I don’t need to tell you that it’s been a rough couple of days… so here’s something that makes me happy: this embroidered collar by Señorita Lylo. For the past week or so, I’ve been staring at all its great details, texture, and color. Loaded with florals and sculptural stitches, this collar is ready to party—just like her other ones.

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Do yourself a favor and follow Señorita Lylo on Instagram!

Señorita Lylo embroidered collar
Embroidery

One Year of Life is Chronicled in “One Year of Stitches”

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

What would a year of stitches look like? Hannah Claire Somerville is currently in the midst of exploration with her project aptly-called 1 Year of Stitches. The premise is simple—each day, she adds at least a stitch (often many more) to the same embroidery hoop. Day by day, the design grows, and with 2016 nearly complete, Hannah has a lot to show for it. Nestled throughout the sprawling threads are the likes of small abstract shapes and colorful characters, each with their own story to tell.

Hannah has chronicled 1 Year of Stitches through Instagram. It’s both a documentation of process as well as a diary—each post is accompanied by what she did that day.

The first stitches have been made. ——————————————– I am interested in the impact, or mark, that an individual makes on a daily basis. Big or small, our daily activities are often times unquantifiable and intangible. I am approaching this project as a personal map making; the fabric ground represents each day of 2016, with the needle and thread representing my actions throughout the day. I will embroider— maybe one stitch, maybe more, (hopefully) every day and photograph the result. The embroidery I create will become a tangible, visual account of the decisions, movements, conversations and sometimes lack there of, that I make each day. I hope to use this project as a means of creating mindfulness and deeper reflection upon the choices we make as a society. Rules and Stipulations: 1. My fabric ground consists of a 12’’ x 12’’ swatch of unbleached Osnaburg. The thread I use may change daily and I may adhere additional types of media to my swatch with thread. 2. I will embroider something on my fabric ground each day and post a photograph of the result each day. 3. It is not required that I make a stitch— some days you definitely do not contribute anything to society. I still must post a photograph of the current state of my fabric ground. 4. I am allowed to remove stitches, because mistakes can sometimes be undone. 5. I am allowed to begin additional fabric grounds should I choose to do so. Ideally, I hope to work on the same fabric ground continuously, but sometimes life takes you to a different place than you expect. 6. More rules and stipulations may be added as the project evolves and lessons are learned. #1yearofstitches #stitch #embroidery #embroideryart #art #2016

A photo posted by 1 year of stitches. (@1yearofstitches) on

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

Embroidery

Exquisite Thread Paintings Capture the Natural Splendor of Earth

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Stephanie Kelly Clark calls herself a “thread painter,” using embroidery to create picturesque landscapes and natural splendor. Her style of stitch is often subtle with various hues mixing on fabric to depict crashing waves, vibrant sunsets, rolling hills, and cloud formations.

Stephanie is formally trained in drawing and painting and uses it to inform her embroidery process. “My background in painting has allowed me to explore the material using techniques from the worlds of drawing and painting,” she writes. “Engaging both traditional and innovative techniques in employing formal qualities with density, texture and pattern.”

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark

Embroidery by Stephanie Kelly Clark
Embroidery

Vibrant Embroideries Inspired by Watercolor Illustrations

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Katy Biele transforms her colorful paintings into equally-as-vibrant hoop art. Her 2D pieces are created using watercolor, and then elements of them are translated into thread on fabric. “I love the different textures that we can have on watercolor paper and on fabric for embroidery,” she writes, “both are different ways but good experimentation to try.”

Have you ever tried that—translating your work into a different format? It’s a great exercise and can give you valuable insight—or inspiration—for future creations.

Katy sells her work in her Etsy shop.

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery by Katy Biele

Embroidery

Eye-Catching Abstract Embroideries Combine Bold Stitches with Vibrant Color

Trini Guzmán

I know I shared the work of Trini Guzmán last week in my 1 theme, 5 ways post, but I can’t help but share her other embroideries—they’re great! She has a bold sense of color that adorns both clothing as well as hoop art. This imagery takes the form of flowers, but it’s often abstract, or a combination of the two. I especially like when she uses thick thread and French knots because it creates a variance in texture that excites the eye.

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán

Embroidery by Trini Guzmán
Embroidery

1 Theme, 5 Ways: Embroidered Denim

Embroidered denim

Let’s face it—embroidered denim is nothing new, but it’s had a resurgence in the past few of years in both DIY circles and on runways like Gucci.

And I am living for it! There’s a stunning juxtaposition between vibrant colors and imagery when paired with the stiff surface of denim. Each makes the other shine, and together they create garments that are statement pieces.

Honestly WTF created a comprehensive DIY on how to embroider your own denim. I am planning on trying it for myself. But in the meantime, here are 5 ways artists / crafters / illustrators to inspire mine and your projects.

Tessa Perlow

Tessa Perlow embroidered denim

I first marveled at Tessa Perlow’s embroideries a few months ago and haven’t stop since. She works on a variety of fabrics, but the denim shift dress above really caught my eye. Tessa has a flair for designing her stitched elements with the curve of the body so that they complement the wearer.

She occasionally puts some of her embroiders for sale on Etsy.

Tessa Perlow embroidered denim

Tessa Perlow embroidered denim

Gucci

Embroidered denim by Gucci

Gucci designed a whole capsule collection around embroidered denim. Reminiscent of their Garden Exclusive, the pieces are emblazoned with butterflies, flowers, and snakes. These elements are scattered on the front and back of clothes, and their application also resembles iron-on patches (also a huge trend!).

Embroidered denim by Gucci

Embroidered denim by Gucci

Bliss and Mischief

Embroidred denim by Bliss and Mischief

Hillary Justin is the founder and designer of Bliss and Mischief, a label inspired by “epic cactus” and the “vivid embroidered details of classic Western kitsch.” Her current collection—which includes a lot of decorative denim—pays tribute to the year 1982 by “obsessing over Edwardian whites, delicate blooms, casual beauty, and all things romantic.”

Embroidred denim by Bliss and Mischief

Embroidred denim by Bliss and Mischief

Trini Guzmán

Embroidered denim by Trini Guzmán

Trini Guzmán brings an abstract vibe to my list. Using bold colors and a lot of French knots, she creates non-representational patterns that seem to take over whatever denim they inhabit.

Embroidered denim by Trini Guzmán

Embroidered denim by Trini Guzmán

Die Trying TX

Embroidered denim by Die Tryin

Lacy Van Court is the lady behind Die Trying TX, a label that upcycles denim into one-of-a-kind pieces. To create this western wear-inspired imagery, she uses vintage machines and hand processes that can take up to six hours to complete.

Embroidered denim by Die Tryin

Embroidered denim by Die Tryin