Browsing Tag

Illustrator

Drawing, Illustrator

Wave Your Flag for Mathilde Vangheluwe’s Fantastic Drawings

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Not every artist can make their sketches appear like fin­ished works, and vice versa — not every fin­ished piece can have the qual­i­ties of a sketch. Mathilde Vangheluwe is an illus­tra­tor who rides this fine line, and she col­ors her draw­ings with the soft hues of col­ored pen­cils, often leav­ing her ini­tial graphite sketch vis­i­ble. This tech­nique is great way to add some shine and pol­ish to some­thing that can feel raw.

Check out Mathilde’s illus­trated prod­ucts in her shop!

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Mathilde Vangheluwe

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Illustrator

Maggie Chiang’s Revealing Landscape Illustrations

Maggie Chiang
If you scroll through illus­tra­tor Mag­gie Chiang’s Tum­blr, you’ll find that there are a lot of shots of the out­doors. I can’t help but think that these visu­als are what seep into her own art­work, as evi­dence of what’s fea­tured here. Each illus­tra­tion includes some ele­ment of the great big world (and even uni­verse). Often, there’s some sort of reveal. They’re beau­ti­ful, allur­ing, and at times poignant, as her sub­jects look dwarfed by what’s around them.

Mag­gie also has a web­site. Check it out here.
Maggie Chiang Maggie Chiang maggiechiang8 maggiechiang2 maggiechiang3 maggiechiang4 maggiechiang5

Illustrator

Herikita Expresses the Feels in Her Series of Odd Illustrations

herikitaconk-1

On Herikita’s Face­book page, she writes, “I do things with my hands that I imag­ine in my head, so peo­ple can see it too.” This sen­ti­ment describes her soft, illus­tra­tive work per­fectly. Her images and imagery are undoubt­edly strange, but in a way that’s relat­able. Many of the inte­rior scenes are like an dia­logue ver­bal­ized, and as a viewer, I rec­og­nize what that is and how it feels to say those things out loud.

In addi­tion to the feels, Herikita also cre­ates loose, delight­fully odd col­lec­tions. A beet, hair­less cat, and bed all make up a sin­gle illus­tra­tion. They seem like a non-sequitur to me, but per­sonal to the illustrator.

Check out more of Herikita’s works on her Tum­blr. You won’t be disappointed.

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Illustrator

Check Out Kyootopia, the Mythical Land of Cute

Kathleen Marcotte

Isn’t this tiger charm­ing? Illus­tra­tor Kath­leen Mar­cotte cre­ated it as part of a group exhi­bi­tion called Kyootopia with Bree Lund­berg and Patu Phan. “We wanted the free­dom to inter­pret ‘cute’ within our own styles,” she tells me, “so we cre­ated the myth­i­cal land of Kyootopia, where all things are cute!”

The three illus­tra­tors divided Kyootopia into nine unique islands and imag­ined their art as well as the lit­tle sou­venirs from each locale. Kath­leen cre­ated Avi­a­tion City, Round­about Island, and Facade Falls.

These delight­ful works are a mix­ture of dig­i­tal works and mixed media pieces. She com­bined linocut, cut paper, and pencil.

Kathleen MarcotteKathleen Marcotte TheGreatGallop ABumpyRide In_FlightBlueHorseBlueTwin YellowTwin OutForAStrutRunawayssneakybovine

Animation, Illustrator

Paper Flowers and Fantastic Beasts Fit for Film

lila poppins

Lila Pop­pins is an illus­tra­tor and paper designer who uses her tal­ents to cre­ate fan­tas­tic beasts, lovely blooms, out­door scenes, and much more. In addi­tion to sculpt­ing with paper, she also directs stop motion films. Lila’s Tum­blr fea­tures a few of these ani­mated snip­pets, one of which is a com­bi­na­tion of paper and 2D illus­tra­tion. The film is an illus­trated French poem writ­ten by Jacques Pre­vert and avail­able to view on Vimeo (I’ve also included it below).

And, just a note: illus­tra­tor Clé­ment De Ruyter is the per­son behind the char­ac­ter design of this crea­ture. (Lila did the paper work, obviously!)

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BPB Projects, Illustrators with Ink

Illustrators with Ink: Lisa Congdon

Lisa Congdon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon.

It’s another install­ment of Illus­tra­tors with Ink, which is quickly becom­ing one of my favorite fea­tures I’ve ever had on Brown Paper Bag. Today, let’s take a look at illus­tra­tor Lisa Congdon’s tattoos!

Lisa Con­g­don is a cre­ative lady who prob­a­bly needs no intro­duc­tion. Her col­or­ful work is fea­tured in mag­a­zines, on wall­pa­per, tex­tiles, and in dif­fer­ent gal­leries around the United States. In addi­tion, Lisa is also a blog­ger and pub­lished author! She def­i­nitely keeps her­self busy, and I’m elated to share with you an inter­view with her about her ink.

How many tat­toos do you have? 12
How old were you when you got your first tat­too? 29 (I am 46 now).
Did you design any your­self? If not, would you ever?No, I don’t have any of my own design on my body, but I have designed many tat­toos for other peo­ple. And I do have a plan to design some­thing for myself soon.
Do you have a favorite? If so, which one and why? My favorite is prob­a­bly my tat­too of my chi­huahua, Wil­fredo. He’s my soul mate, my con­stant com­pan­ion, my anx­i­ety buffer. I love that he’ll be with me for­ever, even after he dies.
Where did you get your work done? I have got­ten tat­toos by a few dif­fer­ent peo­ple, but for the past eight years or so I have been going to Cicely Dani­her at Cyclops Tat­too in the Mis­sion Dis­trict of San Fran­cisco. She’s the best, in my opin­ion.
Is there any mean­ing behind any of your tat­toos? Any sto­ries?I had a really dif­fi­cult and trau­matic life expe­ri­ence last year and dur­ing that time I got my tiger tat­too with the words Je suis fort — which means “I am strong” in French. Hav­ing a tiger on one arm and a chi­huahua on the other keeps me pro­tected.
Do you see a con­nec­tion between the type of tat­toos you have and your illus­tra­tive work?Most of my tat­toos are visual sym­bols of things that I find beau­ti­ful or inspir­ing or sig­nif­i­cant, and so in that way they relate to my work, because my work is often about things I find beau­ti­ful, inspir­ing or sig­nif­i­cant (even dif­fi­cult or sad things). But visu­ally they are super dif­fer­ent because I didn’t design any of them.

lisa congdon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon.

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Der­agon

Thanks, Lisa!

And, here’s some of her work:

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Illustrator

Sarah Burwash Draws “The Summit”

sarah burwash

I’ve been a fan of Sarah Bur­wash (pre­vi­ously) for years now, ever since I saw her ceram­ics appear on Buy Some Damn Art (I am the proud owner of one her limited-edition hands).

She’s released a new series of draw­ings titled The Sum­mit, which are sprawl­ing works where each com­po­si­tion has a lot going on. We see peo­ple and ani­mals inter­act­ing with the great out­doors, and I love the the free­dom she exer­cises with her water-based medium. If you look at the detail shots below, you’ll see the rocks and how she uses a wet-on-wet tech­nique to let the pig­ment go where it may.

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