Browsing Tag

Illustrator

Illustrator, Inspirational Instagram

Inspirational Instagram: Beautiful Watercolor Blooms by @carolynj

Carolyn Gavin

I’m always on the hunt for an inspirational Instagram, and this week, I’ve found it in illustrator Carolyn Gavin. Her posts feature vibrant sketchbook paintings of animals and beautiful blooms, crafted with the carefree fluidity of watercolor. Seeing them has a few effects: for starters, you’ll yearn for spring; then, you’ll want to head to the florist for a real, colorful bouquet, afterwards, you’ll have the urge to pick up your brush and create your own paintings!

After you’ve followed Carolyn on Instagram, check out her Etsy shop for prints and original paintings of these pieces.

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

Carolyn Gavin

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Drawing, Illustrator

Wave Your Flag for Mathilde Vangheluwe’s Fantastic Drawings

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Not every artist can make their sketches appear like finished works, and vice versa — not every finished piece can have the qualities of a sketch. Mathilde Vangheluwe is an illustrator who rides this fine line, and she colors her drawings with the soft hues of colored pencils, often leaving her initial graphite sketch visible. This technique is great way to add some shine and polish to something that can feel raw.

Check out Mathilde’s illustrated products in her shop!

Mathilde Vangheluwe

Mathilde Vangheluwe

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Illustrator

Maggie Chiang’s Revealing Landscape Illustrations

Maggie Chiang
If you scroll through illustrator Maggie Chiang’s Tumblr, you’ll find that there are a lot of shots of the outdoors. I can’t help but think that these visuals are what seep into her own artwork, as evidence of what’s featured here. Each illustration includes some element of the great big world (and even universe). Often, there’s some sort of reveal. They’re beautiful, alluring, and at times poignant, as her subjects look dwarfed by what’s around them.

Maggie also has a website. Check it out here.
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Illustrator

Herikita Expresses the Feels in Her Series of Odd Illustrations

herikitaconk-1

On Herikita’s Facebook page, she writes, “I do things with my hands that I imagine in my head, so people can see it too.” This sentiment describes her soft, illustrative work perfectly. Her images and imagery are undoubtedly strange, but in a way that’s relatable. Many of the interior scenes are like an dialogue verbalized, and as a viewer, I recognize what that is and how it feels to say those things out loud.

In addition to the feels, Herikita also creates loose, delightfully odd collections. A beet, hairless cat, and bed all make up a single illustration. They seem like a non-sequitur to me, but personal to the illustrator.

Check out more of Herikita’s works on her Tumblr. You won’t be disappointed.

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Illustrator

Check Out Kyootopia, the Mythical Land of Cute

Kathleen Marcotte

Isn’t this tiger charming? Illustrator Kathleen Marcotte created it as part of a group exhibition called Kyootopia with Bree Lundberg and Patu Phan. “We wanted the freedom to interpret ‘cute’ within our own styles,” she tells me, “so we created the mythical land of Kyootopia, where all things are cute!”

The three illustrators divided Kyootopia into nine unique islands and imagined their art as well as the little souvenirs from each locale. Kathleen created Aviation City, Roundabout Island, and Facade Falls.

These delightful works are a mixture of digital works and mixed media pieces. She combined linocut, cut paper, and pencil.

Kathleen MarcotteKathleen Marcotte TheGreatGallop ABumpyRide In_FlightBlueHorseBlueTwin YellowTwin OutForAStrutRunawayssneakybovine

Animation, Illustrator

Paper Flowers and Fantastic Beasts Fit for Film

lila poppins

Lila Poppins is an illustrator and paper designer who uses her talents to create fantastic beasts, lovely blooms, outdoor scenes, and much more. In addition to sculpting with paper, she also directs stop motion films. Lila’s Tumblr features a few of these animated snippets, one of which is a combination of paper and 2D illustration. The film is an illustrated French poem written by Jacques Prevert and available to view on Vimeo (I’ve also included it below).

And, just a note: illustrator Clément De Ruyter is the person behind the character design of this creature. (Lila did the paper work, obviously!)

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BPB Projects, Illustrators with Ink

Illustrators with Ink: Lisa Congdon

Lisa Congdon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon.

It’s another installment of Illustrators with Ink, which is quickly becoming one of my favorite features I’ve ever had on Brown Paper Bag. Today, let’s take a look at illustrator Lisa Congdon’s tattoos!

Lisa Congdon is a creative lady who probably needs no introduction. Her colorful work is featured in magazines, on wallpaper, textiles, and in different galleries around the United States. In addition, Lisa is also a blogger and published author! She definitely keeps herself busy, and I’m elated to share with you an interview with her about her ink.

How many tattoos do you have? 12
How old were you when you got your first tattoo? 29 (I am 46 now).
Did you design any yourself? If not, would you ever?No, I don’t have any of my own design on my body, but I have designed many tattoos for other people. And I do have a plan to design something for myself soon.
Do you have a favorite? If so, which one and why? My favorite is probably my tattoo of my chihuahua, Wilfredo. He’s my soul mate, my constant companion, my anxiety buffer. I love that he’ll be with me forever, even after he dies.
Where did you get your work done? I have gotten tattoos by a few different people, but for the past eight years or so I have been going to Cicely Daniher at Cyclops Tattoo in the Mission District of San Francisco. She’s the best, in my opinion.
Is there any meaning behind any of your tattoos? Any stories?I had a really difficult and traumatic life experience last year and during that time I got my tiger tattoo with the words Je suis fort – which means “I am strong” in French. Having a tiger on one arm and a chihuahua on the other keeps me protected.
Do you see a connection between the type of tattoos you have and your illustrative work?Most of my tattoos are visual symbols of things that I find beautiful or inspiring or significant, and so in that way they relate to my work, because my work is often about things I find beautiful, inspiring or significant (even difficult or sad things). But visually they are super different because I didn’t design any of them.

lisa congdon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon.

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Photo credit: Sarah Deragon

Thanks, Lisa!

And, here’s some of her work:

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Illustrator

Sarah Burwash Draws “The Summit”

sarah burwash

I’ve been a fan of Sarah Burwash (previously) for years now, ever since I saw her ceramics appear on Buy Some Damn Art (I am the proud owner of one her limited-edition hands).

She’s released a new series of drawings titled The Summit, which are sprawling works where each composition has a lot going on. We see people and animals interacting with the great outdoors, and I love the the freedom she exercises with her water-based medium. If you look at the detail shots below, you’ll see the rocks and how she uses a wet-on-wet technique to let the pigment go where it may.

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