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Painting

Paintings by Este MacLeod Will Make Your Day Happier

Este MacLeod

Este MacLeod is a UK-based artist whose works are full of color and per­son­al­ity. They’re cubist-inspired paint­ings that offer beau­ti­ful depic­tions of nature and still lifes, cel­e­brat­ing plants, ani­mals, and idyl­lic land­scapes. They use a flat­tened sense of per­spec­tive which makes their com­po­si­tions com­plex. Every inch of her work is cov­ered in vibrant hues and small shapes.

In her Etsy shop, Este sells prints, note­books, and cards of her art­work. Brighten up your home with some of her vibrant works! How could you look at these and not feel happy?

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Painting

Nathalie Lété’s Busy Paintings Make Great Illustrated Products

Nathalie Lété

See that spot­ted dog in the paint­ing above? I love ‘em. And hon­estly, it’s the first thing I noticed when look­ing at Nathalie Lété’s work… like I have some sort of 6th sense for that type of thing. Her paint­ings are full of quirky objects  set against pat­terned back­grounds. They are busy, but so much fun to look at!

In addi­tion to paint­ings, Nathalie’s illus­tra­tions adorn many, many prod­ucts. I’ve included her scarves here, and she’s cre­ated images that are on toys, tote bags, key chains, and ceramics.

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And, a rug!nathalie-8

Drawing, Illustrator, Painting

Laura Knight’s Elegant Ink Drawings of Staffordshire Figures

laura knight

I posted the above illus­tra­tion on my Insta­gram (@brwnpaperbag) recently, but I like it so much that I had to share it here. British graphic artist Laura Knight painted these por­traits that are inspired by Stafford­shire Fig­ures, a pop­u­lar tchotchke for some­one to have in their home.

I’m famil­iar with these types of things after hav­ing vis­ited many antique stores with my mother and woo­ing over them. Laura explains their appeal to the blog Spi­tial­fields Life. “They were on everybody’s mantle­piece and everybody’s dresser. They are a vivid back­ground, deep in our mem­o­ries of home. There wasn’t a kitchen with­out a piece of wil­low pat­tern or a mantle­piece with­out a piece of Stafford­shire,” she says.

Do you/did you have any­thing like these fig­ures grow­ing up?

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Illustrator, Painting

There’s a Palpable Energy to Miroco Machiko’s Painted Animals

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In some works of art, you can tell that the illus­tra­tor has really attacked the image. Not in a bad or destruc­tive way, of course, but there’s a pal­pa­ble energy left on the page. That’s how I feel when I look at the illus­tra­tions by Miroco Machiko. The loose, painterly style fea­tures dif­fer­ent crea­tures in abstracted ways. We see every brush stroke and pen­cil line, which adds to the finished-sketchiness of each image. It’s not over­worked but gives us enough infor­ma­tion to visu­ally put every­thing together.

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Collage, Painting

Emily Isabella’s Adorable Portraits Use Real Flowers for Their Hairdos

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Milk­weed knows she’s attractive.

Paint­ing and flow­ers, sep­a­rately, are two won­der­ful things. But, bet­ter yet, Emily Isabella com­bines both of ‘em with her Plant Peo­ple. She paints their faces and wardrobes and uses a myr­iad of flow­ers for their hair­styles. We see small, del­i­cate pods as well as larger, broad petals that sig­nify longer locks. I love how the blooms are arranged just so, and it allows her to mimic the shape of hair well.

Each image is accom­pa­nied with a curi­ous sen­tence describ­ing the per­son. I’ve included them, too!

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Peony makes friends easily.

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The tem­per­a­ture is start­ing to drop but White Wood Aster doesn’t seem to mind.

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Chrysan­the­mum had a moment of inde­ci­sion at the hair salon.

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Sun­flower isn’t always sunny.

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Cucum­ber Blos­som always adds a touch of beauty to each dish she prepares.

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Goose­neck Looses­trife under­stands the power of a name.

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Hosta’s Japan­ese name is Giboshi.

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A– tisket, a-tasket, Petu­nia prefers a hang­ing basket.

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Blaz­ing Star has a wild side.

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Daylily knows that night is inevitable.

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I think Sweet Pea was lost when I found her on the roadside.

Painting

The Visually Dizzying Works of Husmann/Tschaeni

Husmann/Tschaenihusmanntschaeni12 I don’t know how best to describe these works (are they paint­ings? par­tially pho­tographs?) by Husmann/Tschaeni, so I’ll just let them speak for them­selves. The in-your-face color, tex­ture, and pat­terns are a dizzy­ing com­bi­na­tion that I find cap­ti­vat­ing. They draw me in and I can’t look away. See more images on Husmann/Tschaeni’s web­site, which includes equally as intense series of pho­tographs. Husmann/Tschaeni husmanntschaeni9 husmanntschaeni8 husmanntschaeni7 husmanntschaeni6 husmanntschaeni5 husmanntschaeni4 husmanntschaeni3 husmanntschaeni2 husmanntschaeni1

Illustrator, Painting

Kris Chau’s Lyrical Lines and Ethereal Sketches

kris chau

I was first intro­duced to Kris Chau’s work when I was in under­grad. She was a guest pro­fes­sor for a “lifestyle” illus­tra­tion class I was tak­ing, and I fell in love with her way of draw­ing. Chau uses beau­ti­ful lines through­out each piece that have a lyri­cal feel to them.  And when she’s not doing that, she pep­pers her work with lovely patterns.

If you check out Chau’s blog, she does a lot of sketch­ing. I’ve included some of them here, and they are han­dled more loosely than her paint­ings. She cou­ples this treat­ment with ethe­real depic­tions of god­desses, mer­maids, and spir­its.  It cre­ates an appro­pri­ately dream­like world.

Insta­gram alert: she has one. Fol­low her! (And how about me, while you’re at it?)

kris chau

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Illustrator, Painting

The Differences Between Marianna Sztyma’s Paintings and Illustrations

marianna sztyma

Mar­i­anna Sztyma is a Pol­ish artist and illus­tra­tor who cre­ates beau­ti­ful images in both and col­lage. Here, I’ve fea­tured many of her paint­ings, but take note of her mixed media works, too. They both are tied together in their use of soft, dry-brush/airbrush shad­ing and pen­chant for pat­tern and the female figure.

I have the feel­ing that illus­tra­tion is Sztyma’s pri­mary way of work­ing, and that her paint­ings are a sec­ondary way that she expresses her­self. Artists, illus­tra­tors, and gen­eral cre­ative peo­ple: do you have some­thing like this? Another media you work in to break up the monot­ony of work­ing in one way or style? Let me know on Face­book!

PS: These paint­ings came from her Flickr!

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Painting, Textiles

Smocking and Glazing, All on Sheets by Maria Britton

Maria Britton

In 2010, I attended the Ver­mont Stu­dio Cen­ter for an artist res­i­dency. (To any­one who is con­sid­er­ing apply­ing — you should! I had a great expe­ri­ence.) There, I met Maria Brit­ton, a fel­low artist in a dif­fer­ent stu­dio. At the time, she was paint­ing abstract images on sheets stretched taut over stretcher bars.

Fast for­ward to lately, and I thought about Maria and her work. What does it look like now? Upon Googling her, I see she’s still work­ing on sheets, but in a more refined way. Now, instead of sim­ply paint­ing on top of them, she works into them, incor­po­rat­ing embroi­dery, tech­niques. Here’s a state­ment about her work:

From con­cep­tion to death, the sur­face of a bed is a place where one both expe­ri­ences and escapes real­ity, a phys­i­cal con­nec­tion between dream­ing and wak­ing life. In the stu­dio I seek out home­spun inno­va­tions to play up the mate­ri­al­ity of the pat­terned sheets on which I have been paint­ing for the past 10 years. Recently I have started to incor­po­rate smock­ing, a form of embroi­dery, into my paint­ings which enables me to manip­u­late the sur­face of a sheet into a bumpy, tex­tured, and pat­terned sur­face. After the hand stitch­ing is done on the reverse side of the sheet, I then care­fully stretch the sheet on a stretcher, keep­ing an eye on what each pull does to the sur­face. Using washes, glazes, and streaks of acrylic, I work intu­itively and impul­sively with brushes, sponges, and squeegees. While paint­ing, I am com­pelled to con­ceal and reveal the dated flo­ral pat­terns that I find simul­ta­ne­ously com­fort­ing and repul­sive. The end result is a mish­mash of paint­ing and crafty tech­niques which trans­form the pre­dictable pat­terns into wrin­kled innovations.

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