Illustration

Matte Stephens

You are most like­ly no stranger to the illus­tra­tions of Mat­te Stephens. He has worked for many large clients, includ­ing Her­man Miller, NPR, and Chron­i­cle Books. A fan of vin­tage-esque illus­tra­tions, I am cap­ti­vat­ed by his mut­ed palette, live­ly scenes, and knack for design. I am impressed that Mat­te uses col­ors that can become so eas­i­ly mud­dled — but I don’t think that they are. The col­or adds to his aes­thet­ic of a flat­tened space, sup­port­ed by bold shape design and crisp lines. 

All images via his blog. He also has an Etsy that does very well. 

Matte

Matte

Matte

Matte

Matte

Matte

Collage

Naomi Kolsteren

Much of Nao­mi Kolsteren’s work focus­es on small moments, be it abstract­ed or not. Tex­ture is an obvi­ous­ly impor­tant part of her port­fo­lio and takes var­i­ous forms. Nao­mi looks to be using it via pho­tog­ra­phy, col­lage, ink, and more. 

All images thanks to Naomi’s Flickr. She is also apart of the col­lec­tive Stu­dio Fluit.
collaboration with Vincent Vrints

PLASTIC COLLAGE4

PLASTIC COLLAGE

collage



Lukla



And, from tex­ture to lack of tex­ture, Nao­mi also puts togeth­er plas­tic still lifes that I enjoy: 

plastic stillife

Artist, Embroidery

Kathryn Clark

A for­mer urban plan­ner, Kathryn Clark is very aware of the fore­clo­sure cri­sis that is hap­pen­ing in the Unit­ed States right now. Her series, Fore­clo­sure Quilts pairs quilts with this cri­sis, and inter­est­ing­ly ties home own­er­ship with the hand­ed down his­to­ry of quilts. She writes: 

It was impor­tant to me to present the whole sto­ry in a way that would cap­ti­vate people’s atten­tion and make a mem­o­rable state­ment. Mak­ing map quilts seemed an iron­ic solu­tion. Quilts act as a func­tion­al mem­o­ry, an his­tor­i­cal record of dif­fi­cult times. It is dur­ing times of hard­ship that peo­ple have tra­di­tion­al­ly made quilts, often resort­ing to scraps of cloth when so poor they could not afford to waste a sin­gle thread of fab­ric.

The neigh­bor­hoods shown are not an anom­aly; they are a recur­ring pat­tern seen from coast to coast, urban to sub­ur­ban neigh­bor­hoods across the US. The prob­lem has not been solved, it is still occur­ring, just chang­ing shape, affect­ing more of us. 

All images via her web­site.

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Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Clark1

Artist

Paula Duró

With a mix of the high­ly ren­dered and styl­ized, Paula Duró pro­vides us with land where the super­nat­ur­al is pos­si­ble and flo­res­cent col­ors are apart of the nat­ur­al land­scape. The Argen­tin­ian-based artist paints extreme­ly nar­ra­tive works, a lot of which focus on the hands, and the pow­ers derived from them. 

All images via No Defin­i­ti­vo, of which Paula is involved with. 

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Paula1

Paula1

Paula1

Paula1

Paula1

Paula1

Paula1

Artist

Anna Queen

On Mon­day, I was walk­ing around cam­pus and took a peek inside a stu­dent gallery in the Bunting Cen­ter, the Pinkard Gallery. There, I saw Anna Queen’s solo exhi­bi­tion, Struc­ture. Anna’s work resides in a den of sim­plic­i­ty, with ceram­ic tri­an­gles and cubes installed in the space. Devoid of col­or, her instal­la­tions rely on form and light, which Anna has clear­ly con­sid­ered. It seems she is both aware of their pow­er alone as well as in a group. 

All images via her web­site.

Anna

Anna

Anna

Anna

Anna

Anna

Anna

Time Travel Tuesday

Time Travel Tuesday // Peruvian Artifacts

It’s Tues­day, and anoth­er install­ment of Time Trav­el Tues­day with Rebec­ca of Big Things! I’m real­ly excit­ed about the images that she is pre­sent­ing! Check out what she’s got to say about Peru­vian Arti­facts below! 

Peru2

Recent­ly, I decid­ed it would be worth­while to scan some of my books and share the images online. These are from a 1968 cat­a­log from an exhi­bi­tion at the Guggen­heim called Mas­ter­crafts­men of Ancient Peru. It was the largest exhi­bi­tion of Peru­vian arti­facts ever shown out­side of Peru and includ­ed over 700 objects from pri­vate and pub­lic col­lec­tions.

Peru1
The his­to­ry behind these objects fas­ci­nates me- not only the orig­i­nal mak­er, pur­pose, tech­nique and mate­ri­als, but also the prove­nance of each piece. How is it pos­si­ble that these frag­ile ceram­ics and tex­tiles have sur­vived thou­sands of years of envi­ron­men­tal stress, colo­nial pil­lag­ing, archae­o­log­i­cal exca­va­tions, and black mar­ket deal­ings to final­ly arrive in var­i­ous muse­ums or pri­vate col­lec­tions? What a long and mys­te­ri­ous jour­ney!

Peru1

Peru4

Some of these tex­tiles, name­ly from the Para­cas Necrop­o­lis (c. 500–200 B.C.), are con­sid­ered to be some of the most intri­cate and impres­sive exam­ples of ancient embroi­dery and weav­ing. They were dis­cov­ered wrapped in lay­ers around bod­ies entombed in the ruins of a hill­side com­mu­ni­ty. I love the rich col­ors and geo­met­ric qual­i­ties.

Peru8

Peru6

Peru7

While research­ing the show a bit more, I also found this pho­to of art han­dlers unpack­ing some of the ceram­ics from the show! You can view the rest of the cat­a­logue online here.

finding

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Peru11

Illustration

Vikki Chu

Vik­ki Chu is an illus­tra­tor based out of Vir­ginia. While her rather exten­sive client list requires her to tack­le a myr­i­ad of sub­jects, my ini­tial excite­ment of her work came from the sprawl­ing land­scapes she has drawn. Here, Vik­ki made her work very detailed, and I’m par­tial­ly remind­ed of the Where’s Wal­do book series. Remem­ber­ing this, I get a sim­i­lar feel­ing when look­ing at these pieces out of Vikki’s port­fo­lio — some­thing that I could view over and over again, find­ing new details every time. 

All images via her blog and web­site. Last image is from her inPRNT shop, where you can pur­chase her work! 

Vikki

Vikki

Vikki

Vikki

Vikki

Vikki

Vikki

Artist

Aris Moore

I first saw the work of Aris Moore on The Jeal­ous Cura­tor, and more recent­ly Art Hound. Each time I’ve been real­ly tak­en by her work, which most notably uses facial fea­tures and pro­por­tion in an inter­est­ing and rather uncan­ny way. 

The mut­ed, aged feel­ing of a lot of Aris’s work adds to its uncan­ni­ness, and feels like it could be out of a scary tale. 

All images via her blog.

Aris

Aris

Aris

Aris

Aris

Aris

Aris

Painting

Rebecca Chaperon

I very recent­ly received an email from Rebec­ca Chap­er­on, alert­ing me that she cur­rent­ly has a show at Elis­sa Cristall Gallery in Van­cou­ver until Feb­ru­ary 25th. Not know­ing her work pre­vi­ous­ly, I was real­ly intrigued upon view­ing her paint­ings. They are dark and eerie, and we are guid­ed by a cast of char­ac­ters that seem equal­ly unsure of the land­scape.

More about her work (from her web­site):

Chaperon’s work some­times seem to par­al­lel the mis­ad­ven­tures of var­i­ous hero­ines from lit­er­ary works; her cur­rent paint­ings often por­tray the nar­ra­tive of a female pro­tag­o­nist with­in a slight­ly sur­re­al land­scape. Her work enter­tains the mind with pos­si­ble nar­ra­tives, while haunt­ing with anoth­er, emo­tive under­cur­rent.

All images via her web­site.

Rebecca

Rebecca

Rebecca

Rebecca

Rebecca

Rebecca

Illustration

Lauren Humphrey

I found the work of Lau­ren Humphrey on Art Cake, a fair­ly newish art blog out of Port­land.

Lau­ren is a stu­dent of illus­tra­tion, and her hand-drawn and hand-col­ored works play­ing into a folk-art aes­thet­ic. The com­bi­na­tion of accent­ed sat­u­rat­ed col­or and ink com­pris­es a lot of her stronger pieces. I like the push and pull. 

All images via her Tum­blr.

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren

Lauren