Painting

Shara Hughes

I am real­ly enjoy­ing the spaces that Shara Hugh­es paints. I’m always intrigued by per­son­al, inte­ri­or spaces, as you often learn more about some­one from just view­ing their room rather than speak­ing with them. I sort of feel the same way about Shara’s paint­ings — I am espe­cial­ly curi­ous how the arrange­ment of objects in these types of spaces relates to her own per­son­al­i­ty.

All images via her web­site.

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Miscellany

Infomaniacs // Matthew Thurber

I real­ly enjoy read­ing web comics, and recent came across Info­ma­ni­acs, drawn by Matthew Thurber. Info­ma­ni­acs is a fun­ny yet some­what strange sto­ry of social media and the neu­roses and impli­ca­tions that arise from it. Once I saw the term “glob­al chill­in” used, I knew I was going to enjoy Info­man­ics on a mul­ti­ple lev­els.

It looks like it is updat­ed between a week and 10 days. Check some of it out below and the rest on Pic­ture­Box, where Matthew, along Rebec­ca Bird, they form Muk-Luk.

All images via Pic­ture­Box.

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Illustration

Jenni Sparks

Jen­ni Sparks is a design­er that loves hand-drawn type, and it is clear­ly some­thing that she excels in. Her type is bold and its own way illus­tra­tive, focus­ing a lot on pop­u­lar cul­ture and pop music. If you vis­it her blog, you’ll see her post music videos and talk about The Fresh Prince of Bel Air. You will also see her trip to Kenya — it is obvi­ous that as a typophile, you real­ly notice let­ter­ing all around. Through­out pic­tures of safari and vil­lages are pic­tures of sig­nage, too. 

Jenni’s work match­es the vibe of what she is illus­trat­ing, which she describes as “fun,” to which I’d agree — the hand-drawn qual­i­ty she infus­es in her work gives it a casu­al yet well draft­ed feel. 

All images via her Flickr. Check out her blog and web­site.

Hipster Shit

Will + Kate

Tourist History

Don't Panic Poster Competition Entry - Spirit - I NEED YOUR HELP!

Music Monday #8

Music Monday #5

Music Monday #3

Once More With Feeling

Sculpture

Seripop

Seripop is the col­lab­o­ra­tion between Yan­nick Desran­leau and Chloe Lum who start­ed Seripop in 2002. Hail­ing from Cana­da, the duo seems to cre­ate a lot of screen print­ed works that then make their way to into mas­sive instal­la­tions and oth­er large scale dis­plays.

Extreme­ly play­ful, Seripop’s focus on paper is an inter­est­ing one, espe­cial­ly in What Should Have Been and Would Not (first four images), which the papered pieces in the net seem at once both light and hold much visu­al weight. 

All images via their web­site.

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Collage, Printmaking

Leah Durant

Based in Leeds, Leah Durant states that her pri­ma­ry pas­sion is pho­tog­ra­phy, which is meld­ed with print­mak­ing, col­lage, and draw­ing.

In col­laged pieces, Leah’s pho­tog­ra­phy is often non-spe­cif­ic and enlarged to high­light tex­ture. Aes­thet­i­cal­ly, I love the dif­fused nature of her mark-mak­ing and pho­tos, which speaks to the larg­er scope of her work. She writes: 

The inten­tion of my work is to visu­al­ly record the sub­tleties in every­day life that we do not always notice or appre­ci­ate. For exam­ple, the idea of paus­ing and enjoy­ing a moment that is right there in front of our eyes, such as a shad­ow on a wall, a piece of paper in the wind, or a reflec­tion in a win­dow. Through cap­tur­ing details of things that may seem insignif­i­cant in our dai­ly lives, the frag­ment­ed beau­ty of the sub­ject is brought to the fore­front and chaos is pushed back. Ulti­mate­ly, the raw puri­ty and fragili­ty of the image is unrav­elled.

All images via her website/Tumblr.

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Miscellany

Studio Visit // Jowita Wyszomirska

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

If you were to walk by MICA’s Stu­dio Cen­ter on North Avenue (close to what I am told is the slow­est McDonald’s in the world) dur­ing the month of Jan­u­ary, then you most like­ly saw the work of Jowi­ta Wys­zomirs­ka through the win­dow of MICA’s Cura­to­r­i­al Stud­ies gallery, The Tem­po­rary. Three site-spe­cif­ic instal­la­tions were fea­tured in her solo show, Ten­u­ous Con­nec­tion. I met Jowi­ta in her stu­dio that is housed in School 33, an art space in down­town Bal­ti­more. The space itself has won­der­ful views of the city and a lot of room for her and her hus­band to share their work space. 

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita’s recent endeav­ors take shape in instal­la­tions (such as the one in her stu­dio) and draw­ings. Pen, gouache, and tape are all used to cre­ate intri­cate works that are metic­u­lous yet min­i­mal in detail. Cit­ing archi­tec­ture and maps as inspi­ra­tion, a recent set of draw­ings reflect the routes of the Pur­ple Line, a bus line of the Charm City Cir­cu­la­tor in Bal­ti­more.

It was nice to see the pro­gres­sion that Jowita’s work has tak­en. In a rel­a­tive­ly short peri­od of time, her work went from three dimen­sion­al paint­ings of build­ings, to a focus on the fold­ed forms of those build­ings, to the instal­la­tion on the wall. Always want­i­ng to chal­lenge her­self, Jowi­ta told me it was to fueled by the desire to speed up her work­ing process. Tape is faster than paint — more imme­di­ate results and exer­cis­es ideas quick­ly.

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Below: An exam­ple of the box­es Jowi­ta made after paint­ing archi­tec­ture. Image via web­site.

Jowita

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Over­all, I liked Jowita’s way of work­ing jux­ta­posed with the result of her work (instal­la­tions, specf­i­cal­ly). Although she tends not to sketch before she starts work­ing, her years of being an exhi­bi­tion fab­ri­ca­tor have made her process-ori­ent­ed and it seems to have keep her attuned to refin­ing her artis­tic process. So far, this has been work­ing — her work con­tin­ues to move on an inter­est­ing path of abstract­ed obser­va­tions. I’ll be excit­ed to see the work she has com­ing up for an exhi­bi­tion in June, and how it is a con­tin­u­a­tion of where she is work­ing now.

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Jowita Wyszomirska Studio Visit

Thanks Jowi­ta!

Artist

Sarah Williamson

The illus­tra­tion and paint­ings of Sarah Williamson are sim­ply won­der­ful, uti­liz­ing a few dif­fer­ent tech­niques to bring forth her visu­al lan­guage. There is a major empha­sis on the free­dom of media (as she paints with wet-on-wet) and a love the fig­ure and land­scape. Inspired by what’s around her, the Brook­lynite writes: 

I used to work, but one day I picked up a pen and images came, I began to see all of the dreams the decay and the excess around me. Around all of us. I once read in a very famous book, “All things are full of labor, man can­not utter it…” But I don’t think of what I do now as labor. My work feels like a nat­ur­al prod­uct of curios­i­ty about our sur­round­ings: peo­ple and things dis­in­te­grat­ing, dream­ing, liv­ing, not liv­ing. The world is full of col­or, I can­not utter. 

All images via her web­site.

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Sculpture

Gina Dawson

I first spoke of the work of Gina Daw­son when I saw it as part of a group show, Bound­ry Proof, at the Guest Spot Art Space in Bal­ti­more. She cre­at­ed these amaz­ing minia­ture funer­al wreathes made out of paper. The text on the ban­ners were extract­ed from rejec­tion let­ters, which Gina had embroi­dered:

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Check­ing in on Gina’s work, I found dis­cov­ered her newest endeav­or — the cre­ation of flow­ers out of paper and place­ment in unex­pect­ed places. Small wild­flow­ers placed in the cracks of build­ings, and green­ery installed on rocks. These small addi­tions to the land­scape real­ly make the passer­by more aware and con­scious of the space and make it feel a bit more pre­cious. I’m remind­ed of the Dis­patch­work project but with an organ­ic twist. 

All images via Gina’s blog.

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Artist

Jenny Harp

Jen­ny Harp is an artist liv­ing and work­ing in San Fran­cis­co. Her mixed media work is an exam­i­na­tion of our inner work­ings in rela­tion­ship to cul­ture. From her artist state­ment:

My present work stems from ten­sions and com­forts that reflect feel­ings of anx­i­ety, cel­e­bra­tion, pow­er and con­trol and the bound­aries between them. Cul­tur­al­ly I inves­ti­gate the emo­tion­al rela­tion­ships that dwell in the inter­me­di­ate space between the nat­ur­al world and the domes­tic world by way of choice mate­ri­als and images from Amer­i­can Sub­cul­tures. I explore rela­tion­ships of col­or, com­po­si­tion and objects with­in these con­texts.

All images via her web­site.

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Animation, Illustration

Lisette Berndt aka Thoka Maer

I first saw the work of Lisette Berndt, aka Tho­ka Maer, through her Tum­blr, It’s No Big­gie. I think I’ve men­tioned how much I love ani­mat­ed GIFs, and was espe­cial­ly delight­ed to see the ele­ment of the hand in Lisette’s ani­ma­tions. It’s No Big­gie, she writes, is a “satir­i­cal com­ment about our dai­ly life obsta­cles in form of loop­ing gif ani­ma­tion.” All images via her Tum­blr.

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Lisette’s oth­er illus­tra­tions (and ani­ma­tions!) share sim­i­lar qual­i­ties to her GIFs. Styl­is­ti­cal­ly, she uses a light hand with min­i­mal line work to tell a sto­ry or describe a place. With col­ored pen­cil, graphite, or ink, Lisette com­mu­ni­cates a feel­ing of intro­spec­tion and a tinge of sad­ness.

All images via her web­site.

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infra 6 from Tho­ka Maer on Vimeo.

infra 7 from Tho­ka Maer on Vimeo.