Illustrated products, Sculpture

Adorably Tiny Totem Creatures That Fit on Your Fingertips

Ramalama creatures

If you feel comforted by tiny animal companions, then RamaLama Creatures is going to make you real happy. Small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, the adorable polymer sculptures are hand painted with a ton of intricate detail and finished with a glossy varnish.

Raminta is the lady behind RamaLama creatures, and she’s always had a fascination with the beauty of nature—her childhood was spent on the Baltic Sea shore. After graduating with a degree in photography, she dedicated herself to “mastering skills and perfecting design” of her characters. It usually takes days to create a single animal.

RamaLama Creatures are available on Etsy, but they’re often sold out. Follow Raminta on Instagram to see what’s coming up next!

ramalama-4

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures
Paper Craft

Delicate Paper Floral Wreaths to Dazzle and Empower You

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

If you’re still feeling down about recent events (I know I am), Grace Chin offers a beautiful pick-me-up with her empowering floral wreaths. Combining paper craft with text, she creates delicate faux flowers and arranges them onto a circular form. In the middle of it, she places cut-paper letters phrases like “All bodies are good bodies” and “Be brave.”

She writes,

My work is inextricably tied to my passion for intersectional feminism and fighting negative forces— both political and personal—with words. I sincerely believe in the power of internalizing and imbibing positive messages. In particular, I’m in search of pithy, compelling statements that are meant to occupy primarily domestic spaces and serve as daily reminders.

Grace continues,

Compositionally, I take influence from the Dutch tradition of pronkstilleven (decadent still life painting), as well as outsider and American folk art. In positioning myself firmly between craft and art traditions, I hope to do what many women artists and artisans did before me: create beautiful everyday objects that also serve some usefulness beyond their aesthetic value.

Grace sells her work (including these wreaths!) through her online shop.

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace D. Chin empowering floral wreaths
Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 11

1. Terrarium Back Patch By Rand Renfrow
2. Snake Knot Ring by Kaye Blegvad
3. Heart Leaf Enamel Pin by Sarah Abbott
4. Lunar Blossom Embroidery Kit by Cozyblue
5. Wall Lamp BULB by Madda
6. Banana Pillow by thing Ind.
7. Mexico Lindo Earrings by La vidriola

Illustrator Leah Goren just came out with this new book that celebrates female friendships, aptly titled Besties. Perfect timing for the gift-giving season—and especially considering the events of this past week.

Besties

Embroidery

A Colorful Embroidered Collar to Add to Your Dream Wardrobe

Señorita Lylo

I don’t need to tell you that it’s been a rough couple of days… so here’s something that makes me happy: this embroidered collar by Señorita Lylo. For the past week or so, I’ve been staring at all its great details, texture, and color. Loaded with florals and sculptural stitches, this collar is ready to party—just like her other ones.

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Do yourself a favor and follow Señorita Lylo on Instagram!

Señorita Lylo embroidered collar
Embroidery

One Year of Life is Chronicled in “One Year of Stitches”

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

What would a year of stitches look like? Hannah Claire Somerville is currently in the midst of exploration with her project aptly-called 1 Year of Stitches. The premise is simple—each day, she adds at least a stitch (often many more) to the same embroidery hoop. Day by day, the design grows, and with 2016 nearly complete, Hannah has a lot to show for it. Nestled throughout the sprawling threads are the likes of small abstract shapes and colorful characters, each with their own story to tell.

Hannah has chronicled 1 Year of Stitches through Instagram. It’s both a documentation of process as well as a diary—each post is accompanied by what she did that day.

The first stitches have been made. ——————————————– I am interested in the impact, or mark, that an individual makes on a daily basis. Big or small, our daily activities are often times unquantifiable and intangible. I am approaching this project as a personal map making; the fabric ground represents each day of 2016, with the needle and thread representing my actions throughout the day. I will embroider— maybe one stitch, maybe more, (hopefully) every day and photograph the result. The embroidery I create will become a tangible, visual account of the decisions, movements, conversations and sometimes lack there of, that I make each day. I hope to use this project as a means of creating mindfulness and deeper reflection upon the choices we make as a society. Rules and Stipulations: 1. My fabric ground consists of a 12’’ x 12’’ swatch of unbleached Osnaburg. The thread I use may change daily and I may adhere additional types of media to my swatch with thread. 2. I will embroider something on my fabric ground each day and post a photograph of the result each day. 3. It is not required that I make a stitch— some days you definitely do not contribute anything to society. I still must post a photograph of the current state of my fabric ground. 4. I am allowed to remove stitches, because mistakes can sometimes be undone. 5. I am allowed to begin additional fabric grounds should I choose to do so. Ideally, I hope to work on the same fabric ground continuously, but sometimes life takes you to a different place than you expect. 6. More rules and stipulations may be added as the project evolves and lessons are learned. #1yearofstitches #stitch #embroidery #embroideryart #art #2016

A photo posted by 1 year of stitches. (@1yearofstitches) on

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 4, 2016

1. Shut-Eye ‘Lash’ Stud Earrings by Ginny Reynders
2. Frog Plate by Kom
3. Vegan Necklace by La Vidriola (I became obsessed with it after Tuesday’s post)
4. Portugal in a Can by Mar Cerdá
5. Flutter Necklaces and Rings by Black Rabbit Studio
6. Bangles by Dinara Mirtalipova
7. Tropical Birds Tile by Bodil Jane (I recently wrote about her work!)

Looking for an advent calendar for Christmas? Harriet Gray of the Hello Harriet shop is now taking pre-orders for her delightful calendar that comes complete with “24 purrfectly grumpy temporary tattoos,” plus an enamel pin on Christmas day.

Cat advent calendar by Hello Harriet

Illustration

Spellbinding Nature Scenes Showcase the Intricate Beauty of Earth

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustrates spell-binding scenes of nature. Intricately detailed and visually complex, the layers of flora and fauna draw you into these snippets of stories, which act as a fantasy for a city dweller like me. Long grass, fields of flowers, and bodies of water seem like distant relatives—so Kailey’s work is especially nice to view, especially when your windows overlook concrete.

Kailey sells a selection of her work on Society6.

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration
Illustration

Ethereal Paintings Combine Color and Emotion for a Dreamlike Feel

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustrator Diana Cojocaru first caught my attention with her collection entitled Human Wings. Using water-based media, she lets the vibrant hues have a mind of their own as they bleed into one another and create a dreamlike feel. Hands are a thematic occurrence in her work, and about the series, she explains it with one single quote by Sanober Khan: “Your hand touching mine—this is how galaxies collide.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

 

In her Beyond project, Diana was inspired by a passion for flowers, hidden messages, and again—hands!

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana’s current project started as a challenge to herself. 

“I’ve always considered that I’m not able to draw portraits, with everything I’ve created so far revolving around abstract concepts,” she tells me an in an email. “Even though my style is a clumsy one, I want to bring my illustrations into the fashion area and to communicate through the clumsiness itself that every woman has a beauty which is often hidden behind peculiar features, far from the stereotypes.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana Cojocaru illustrations