Illustrated products, Sculpture

Adorably Tiny Totem Creatures That Fit on Your Fingertips

Ramalama creatures

If you feel com­fort­ed by tiny ani­mal com­pan­ions, then RamaLa­ma Crea­tures is going to make you real hap­py. Small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, the adorable poly­mer sculp­tures are hand paint­ed with a ton of intri­cate detail and fin­ished with a glossy var­nish.

Ram­inta is the lady behind RamaLa­ma crea­tures, and she’s always had a fas­ci­na­tion with the beau­ty of nature—her child­hood was spent on the Baltic Sea shore. After grad­u­at­ing with a degree in pho­tog­ra­phy, she ded­i­cat­ed her­self to “mas­ter­ing skills and per­fect­ing design” of her char­ac­ters. It usu­al­ly takes days to cre­ate a sin­gle ani­mal.

RamaLa­ma Crea­tures are avail­able on Etsy, but they’re often sold out. Fol­low Ram­inta on Insta­gram to see what’s com­ing up next!

ramalama-4

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures

Ramalama creatures
Paper Craft

Delicate Paper Floral Wreaths to Dazzle and Empower You

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

If you’re still feel­ing down about recent events (I know I am), Grace Chin offers a beau­ti­ful pick-me-up with her empow­er­ing flo­ral wreaths. Com­bin­ing paper craft with text, she cre­ates del­i­cate faux flow­ers and arranges them onto a cir­cu­lar form. In the mid­dle of it, she places cut-paper let­ters phras­es like “All bod­ies are good bod­ies” and “Be brave.”

She writes,

My work is inex­tri­ca­bly tied to my pas­sion for inter­sec­tion­al fem­i­nism and fight­ing neg­a­tive forces— both polit­i­cal and personal—with words. I sin­cere­ly believe in the pow­er of inter­nal­iz­ing and imbib­ing pos­i­tive mes­sages. In par­tic­u­lar, I’m in search of pithy, com­pelling state­ments that are meant to occu­py pri­mar­i­ly domes­tic spaces and serve as dai­ly reminders.

Grace con­tin­ues,

Com­po­si­tion­al­ly, I take influ­ence from the Dutch tra­di­tion of pronkstilleven (deca­dent still life paint­ing), as well as out­sider and Amer­i­can folk art. In posi­tion­ing myself firm­ly between craft and art tra­di­tions, I hope to do what many wom­en artists and arti­sans did before me: cre­ate beau­ti­ful every­day objects that also serve some use­ful­ness beyond their aes­thet­ic val­ue.

Grace sells her work (includ­ing the­se wreaths!) through her online shop.

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace Chin empowering floral wreaths

Grace D. Chin empowering floral wreaths
Collage, Illustration

Cut Paper Collages Enhanced with the Power of a Pen

Irene Servillo illustration

For the past week, I’ve con­tin­u­al­ly admired the cut paper illus­tra­tions of Irene Servil­lo. It might come as no surprise—after all, her work is craft­ed out of col­lage, my favorite medi­um. Using cut paper and draw­ing, Irene cre­ates styl­ized fig­ures and sce­nes by employ­ing col­or­ful, eye-pleas­ing shapes that inter­min­gle through­out the com­po­si­tion.

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration

Irene Servillo illustration
Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 11

1. Ter­rar­i­um Back Patch By Rand Ren­frow
2. Snake Knot Ring by Kaye Bleg­vad
3. Heart Leaf Enam­el Pin by Sarah Abbott
4. Lunar Blos­som Embroi­dery Kit by Cozy­blue
5. Wall Lamp BULB by Mad­da
6. Banana Pil­low by thing Ind.
7. Mex­i­co Lin­do Ear­rings by La vidri­o­la

Illus­tra­tor Leah Goren just came out with this new book that cel­e­brates female friend­ships, apt­ly titled Besties. Per­fect tim­ing for the gift-giv­ing season—and espe­cial­ly con­sid­er­ing the events of this past week.

Besties

Embroidery

A Colorful Embroidered Collar to Add to Your Dream Wardrobe

Señorita Lylo

I don’t need to tell you that it’s been a rough cou­ple of days… so here’s some­thing that makes me hap­py: this embroi­dered col­lar by Señori­ta Lylo. For the past week or so, I’ve been star­ing at all its great details, tex­ture, and col­or. Load­ed with flo­rals and sculp­tural stitch­es, this col­lar is ready to par­ty—just like her oth­er ones.

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Señorita Lylo

Do your­self a favor and fol­low Señori­ta Lylo on Insta­gram!

Señorita Lylo embroidered collar
Paper Craft

Tiny Terrariums You Can Hold in the Palm of Your Hand

Cameron Garland

Cameron Gar­land crafts tiny ter­rar­i­ums you can hold in the palm of your hand. The intri­cate­ly detailed cut-paper cre­ations show­case minus­cule suc­cu­lents thriv­ing in gold­en geo­met­ric planters that I wish I owned. A com­bi­na­tion of col­lage and draw­ing, they resem­ble the real thing—a big trend in decor—sans the mess. Sounds good to me!

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland

Cameron Garland
Embroidery

One Year of Life is Chronicled in “One Year of Stitches”

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

What would a year of stitch­es look like? Han­nah Claire Somerville is cur­rent­ly in the mid­st of explo­ration with her project apt­ly-called 1 Year of Stitch­es. The premise is simple—each day, she adds at least a stitch (often many more) to the same embroi­dery hoop. Day by day, the design grows, and with 2016 near­ly com­plete, Han­nah has a lot to show for it. Nes­tled through­out the sprawl­ing threads are the likes of small abstract shapes and col­or­ful char­ac­ters, each with their own sto­ry to tell.

Han­nah has chron­i­cled 1 Year of Stitch­es through Insta­gram. It’s both a doc­u­men­ta­tion of process as well as a diary—each post is accom­pa­nied by what she did that day.

The first stitch­es have been made. ——————————————– I am inter­est­ed in the impact, or mark, that an indi­vid­u­al makes on a dai­ly basis. Big or small, our dai­ly activ­i­ties are often times unquan­tifi­able and intan­gi­ble. I am approach­ing this project as a per­son­al map mak­ing; the fab­ric ground rep­re­sents each day of 2016, with the needle and thread rep­re­sent­ing my actions through­out the day. I will embroi­der— may­be one stitch, may­be more, (hope­ful­ly) every day and pho­tograph the result. The embroi­dery I cre­ate will become a tan­gi­ble, visu­al account of the deci­sions, move­ments, con­ver­sa­tions and some­times lack there of, that I make each day. I hope to use this project as a means of cre­at­ing mind­ful­ness and deep­er reflec­tion upon the choic­es we make as a soci­ety. Rules and Stip­u­la­tions: 1. My fab­ric ground con­sists of a 12’’ x 12’’ swatch of unbleached Osnaburg. The thread I use may change dai­ly and I may adhere addi­tion­al types of media to my swatch with thread. 2. I will embroi­der some­thing on my fab­ric ground each day and post a pho­tograph of the result each day. 3. It is not required that I make a stitch— some days you def­i­nite­ly do not con­tribute any­thing to soci­ety. I still must post a pho­tograph of the cur­rent state of my fab­ric ground. 4. I am allowed to remove stitch­es, because mis­takes can some­times be undone. 5. I am allowed to begin addi­tion­al fab­ric grounds should I choose to do so. Ide­al­ly, I hope to work on the same fab­ric ground con­tin­u­ous­ly, but some­times life takes you to a dif­fer­ent place than you expect. 6. More rules and stip­u­la­tions may be added as the project evolves and lessons are learned. #1yearof­stitch­es #stitch #embroi­dery #embroi­der­yart #art #2016

A pho­to post­ed by 1 year of stitch­es. (@1yearofstitches) on

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

1 Year of Stitches by Hannah Claire Somerville

Illustrated products

My Weekly 7 Illustrated Product Obsessions

Illustrated product obsessions, November 4, 2016

1. Shut-Eye ‘Lash’ Stud Ear­rings by Gin­ny Reyn­ders
2. Frog Plate by Kom
3. Veg­an Neck­lace by La Vidri­o­la (I became obsessed with it after Tuesday’s post)
4. Por­tu­gal in a Can by Mar Cerdá
5. Flut­ter Neck­laces and Rings by Black Rab­bit Stu­dio
6. Ban­gles by Dinara Mir­tal­ipo­va
7. Trop­i­cal Birds Tile by Bod­il Jane (I recent­ly wrote about her work!)

Look­ing for an advent cal­en­dar for Christ­mas? Har­ri­et Gray of the Hel­lo Har­ri­et shop is now tak­ing pre-orders for her delight­ful cal­en­dar that comes com­plete with “24 purr­fect­ly grumpy tem­po­rary tat­toos,” plus an enam­el pin on Christ­mas day.

Cat advent calendar by Hello Harriet

Illustration

Spellbinding Nature Scenes Showcase the Intricate Beauty of Earth

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kai­ley Whit­man illus­trates spell-bind­ing sce­nes of nature. Intri­cate­ly detailed and visu­al­ly com­plex, the lay­ers of flo­ra and fau­na draw you into the­se snip­pets of sto­ries, which act as a fan­ta­sy for a city dweller like me. Long grass, fields of flow­ers, and bod­ies of water seem like dis­tant relatives—so Kailey’s work is espe­cial­ly nice to view, espe­cial­ly when your win­dows over­look con­crete.

Kai­ley sells a selec­tion of her work on Soci­ety6.

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration

Kailey Whitman illustration
Illustration

Ethereal Paintings Combine Color and Emotion for a Dreamlike Feel

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illus­tra­tor Diana Cojo­caru first caught my atten­tion with her col­lec­tion enti­tled Human Wings. Using water-based media, she lets the vibrant hues have a mind of their own as they bleed into one anoth­er and cre­ate a dream­like feel. Hands are a the­mat­ic occur­rence in her work, and about the series, she explains it with one sin­gle quote by Sanober Khan: “Your hand touch­ing mine—this is how galax­ies col­lide.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

 

In her Beyond project, Diana was inspired by a passion for flowers, hidden messages, and again—hands!

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana’s current project started as a challenge to herself. 

I’ve always con­sid­ered that I’m not able to draw por­traits, with every­thing I’ve cre­at­ed so far revolv­ing around abstract con­cepts,” she tells me an in an email. “Even though my style is a clum­sy one, I want to bring my illus­tra­tions into the fash­ion area and to com­mu­ni­cate through the clum­si­ness itself that every wom­an has a beau­ty which is often hid­den behind pecu­liar fea­tures, far from the stereo­types.”

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Illustration by Diana Cojocaru

Diana Cojocaru illustrations