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art

Paper Craft

Sweet Sentiments in Cut Paper Illustrations by Jotaká

Jotaká

Ya’ll know I love cut paper illus­tra­tions. So, imag­ine my delight when I dis­cov­ered the work of Jotaká, an illus­tra­tor from Valen­cia, Spain. His project called La siesta is a per­sonal project “about hugs, the impor­tance and the ideal time to receive them.” The bright por­traits are a tan­gle of limbs as peo­ple wrap their arms around each other in a lov­ing embrace. Not only humans, though, but other things, too—cats, dogs, books, and records.

There are cou­ple of things I really enjoy about Jotaká’s series: one is the sweet sen­ti­ment that the images con­vey; another is the styl­is­tic choice of lay­er­ing the paper shapes to cre­ate some depth and three dimensionality.

FYI — I first posted La siesta on my Tum­blr last Thurs­day night. Fol­low it for some fun illus­tra­tion extras!

Jotaká

Jotaká

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Illustrator

Madeline Kloepper Explores the Relationships We Forge with Nature

Madeline Kloepper

Illus­tra­tor Made­line Kloep­per explores the rela­tion­ships we forge with nature through her gor­geous and allur­ing paint­ings. The works have ele­ments of sur­re­al­ism as drag­ons, danc­ing bears, and larger-than-life birds all make an appearance.

I really enjoy Madeline’s more detailed com­po­si­tions, specif­i­cally the ones fea­tur­ing a quilted blan­ket fort and clothes line. The heavily-patterned tex­tiles tell us a lot, like  char­ac­ters’ per­son­al­ity and their aes­thetic pref­er­ences. In addi­tion, we under­stand more about the char­ac­ters in how they inter­act with these objects. Here, it com­mu­ni­cates a rev­er­ence for sim­pler times that are away from screens and stresses of every­day life.

Fol­low Made­line on Tum­blr, too! (H/T Per­rin)
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Ceramics, Illustrator

Illustrated Bowls That Talk Back to You While You Eat

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How would you like it if your plates and bowls talked back to you? In this col­lab­o­ra­tion between illus­tra­tor San­ti­ago Uceda and artist Nancy Froehlich, you don’t have much of a choice! They occupy the bot­toms of dishes, direct­ing you, cheer­ing you on, and telling you what you already know — that the meal you just ate was so good. The amus­ing char­ac­ters were cre­ated by San­ti­ago and then placed onto forms cre­ated by Nancy.

I would love to own one of these delight­ful pieces. Alas, I can’t find any­where to buy them! It looks like, accord­ing to Santiago’s Insta­gram, that they were for sale a while ago… and have prob­a­bly sold out since!

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Illustrator

Escape to APAK’s Magical, Mystical Worlds

APAK

APAK is an illus­tra­tive col­lab­o­ra­tion between Aaron Piland and Ayumi Kajikawa Piland. They’re self described as a fan­tas­ti­cal mag­i­cal duo, and they’re also mar­ried! The Portland-based cou­ple “live among the fury conifer giants in a lit­tle cot­tage,” and their whim­si­cal cre­ations are a way to explore the beauty and mys­ter­ies of life. This sen­ti­ment is reflected in the col­or­ful com­po­si­tions and del­i­cate, small char­ac­ters that exist in great big worlds.

Love these images? Well, you’re in luck! They’re all avail­able in APAK’s Etsy shop!

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Paper Craft

A Mural Made Completely Out of Paper by Mlle Hipolyte

Mlle Hipolyte
Not too long ago, I shared some of Mlle Hipolyte’s amaz­ing paper-crafted masks. Since then, I’ve been keep­ing an eye on her work. I was perus­ing Insta­gram yes­ter­day and saw snip­pets of her mural-sized paper project. How great! And, bet­ter yet, Mlle posted the entire Trop­i­cal Jun­gle on her website.

She explains on Bored Panda that every­thing was cut by hand, and it took two weeks to get the paper ele­ments ready to go up on the wall. After­wards, it took six hours to apply it to the ver­ti­cal sur­face. Totally worth the time and energy. I love the col­ors and all the small details.
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Illustrator, Textiles

Sofia Arnold’s Naturalistic Scenes of Wild Fantasies

Sofia Arnold

For years, I’ve mar­veled at the work of Sofia Arnold. Her nat­u­ral­is­tic scenes are wild fan­tasies fea­tur­ing a host of char­ac­ters. Look closely, and you’ll see women in flow­ing dresses, small ani­mals, and ener­getic chil­dren woven in her compositions.

In an inter­view with Buy Some Damn Art, Sofia talks about recy­cling imagery and ideas in her work. It’s a valu­able prac­tice that can help your work feel con­cep­tu­ally cohe­sive. ” A copy of a copy of a copy might become visu­ally unrec­og­niz­able from the source, but I think that con­tin­ued reit­er­a­tion will even­tu­ally dis­till some kind of mean­ing for me,” she says.

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And here’s a lit­tle extra. Sofia sells this awe­some small patches in her Big Car­tel shop!

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Illustrator

A Narwhal with a Ukulele? Now, That’s a Party!

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Doesn’t this (above) illus­tra­tion by Aniek Bar­tels per­fectly cap­ture the essence of Spring? I am wish­ing for tem­per­a­tures warm enough to ride on a bike with­out a jacket.

If you think that image is fun, check out the rest of her happy draw­ings below. March­ing ele­phants, nar­whals with ukule­les… that’s a party I want to go to! Aniek has a Soci­ety 6 shop, too, in case you want any of these char­ac­ters on your iPhone case.

 

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Artist

Wearable Art: Anna Talbot’s Beautifully Sculptural Jewelry

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Nor­we­gian craft artist Anna Tal­bot pro­duces col­or­ful jew­elry that’s beau­ti­fully uncon­ven­tional. Vibrant, bold shapes are lay­ered and cre­ate com­plex scenes fea­tur­ing birds, flo­ral arrange­ments, and tall trees. Each piece is spe­cial and daz­zling, and con­jures fairy tales and other fan­tas­tic sto­ries. Wear­able art indeed. (Via Lustik)

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Artist, Illustrator

Eero Lampinen’s Beautiful Depictions of Strange Lands

Eero Lampinen

On both Mon­day and Tues­day of this week, I’ve fea­tured illus­tra­tions that are strange. So, how about I make Wednes­day just as weird? I recently posted the work of Eero Lampinen on my Insta­gram to great response. And, why not? The beau­ti­ful images are really well drawn and fea­ture odd, inter­est­ing depic­tions of nature. Giant bugs crawl over styl­ish young peo­ple who dare to ven­ture into lands unknown.

I would love to see what Lampinen does with a graphic novel. Con­sid­er­ing the way they set up a sin­gle scene, pan­els upon pan­els of them would be amazing.

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Artist

Wooden People Capture the Imagination of Children

melanie rustonI posted about some wooden peo­ple ear­lier, so why not more? Melanie Rus­ton is a Baltimore-based artist who’s study­ing to be an art teacher (and about to grad­u­ate!). Her paint­ings are influ­enced by work­ing with chil­dren as a camp coun­selor and an intern; specif­i­cally, them draw­ing from their imag­i­na­tions with­out fear of the final result.

When I paint, I take char­ac­ters from my sketch­book and flesh out their exis­tence in imag­ined stores, where they deal with embar­rass­ment, tri­umph, and rela­tion­ships with oth­ers,” she writes in an artist state­ment. Melanie goes on, stat­ing, “Com­bin­ing a Renais­sance tech­nique with the artis­tic skills of a child, I leave clues for the viewer to solve and under­stand these moments for themselves.”

Fol­low Melanie on Tum­blr.

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Here are some non-wooden peo­ple, includ­ing a mural!

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